Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Carolina Reapers are some of the hottest peppers in the world. So hot, in fact, that for one man, participating in a pepper-eating contestant resulted in a painful, serious "thunderclap headache." Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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The Super-Hot Pepper That Sent A Man To The ER

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The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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Researchers looked at states with medical marijuana dispensaries and those that allow home cultivation. Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Opioid Use Lower In States That Eased Marijuana Laws

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Michael Robertson in his home on in Washington, D.C. Years ago, he didn't feel well and chalked it up to work stress. It was much more serious than that. Kelly Jo Smart for NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart for NPR

The 30-Year Quest To Tame The 'Wily' Cancer Gene

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Major Medical Associations Feud Over Diabetes Guidelines

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A nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta last month. The disease is still "widespread" in many places, but slowing. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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