Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

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A Stanford University study explored the medical records of millions of people looking for patterns. People taking proton-pump inhibitors for chronic heartburn seemed to be at somewhat higher risk of having a heart attack than people not taking the pills. IStockphoto hide caption

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Data Dive Suggests Link Between Heartburn Drugs And Heart Attacks

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Costs Of Slipshod Research Methods May Be In The Billions

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A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes — they're yellow — that help the virus infect its host cells. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Multiple Sclerosis Patients Stressed Out By Soaring Drug Costs

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Corbis

Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

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The posterior end of the Loa loa worm is visible on the left. The disease-causing worm can now be located with a smartphone/microscope hookup. That's a big help because a drug to treat river blindness can be risky if the patient is carrying the worm. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Smartphones Can Be Smart Enough To Find A Parasitic Worm

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Bob Skierski at the beach in Avalon, N.J., just hours before he fell ill and went to the hospital. He never went home. Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers hide caption

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Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers

Sepsis, A Wily Killer, Stymies Doctors' Efforts To Tame It

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Rod-shaped specimens of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial cause of plague, find a happy home here in the foregut of a flea. Fleas can transmit the infection to animals and people, who can get pneumonic plague and transmit the infection through a cough or kiss. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Small Plague Outbreak In People Tracked To Pit Bull

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A man stands near collapsed houses in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, on April 27, two days after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit Nepal. Aftershocks tend to get less frequent with time, scientists say, but not necessarily gentler. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Big Aftershocks In Nepal Could Persist For Years

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Sequencing the genes of a cancer cell turns up lots of genetic mutations — but some of them are harmless. The goal is to figure out which mutations are the troublemakers. Kevin Curtis/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Curtis/Science Source

Personalizing Cancer Treatment With Genetic Tests Can Be Tricky

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The blood cancer in soft-shell clams poses no risk to humans, but it does kill the shellfish. Pat Wellenbach/AP hide caption

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Pat Wellenbach/AP

Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard

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For someone 2.5 inches shorter than average, the risk of coronary artery disease increases by about 13.5 percent, scientists found. PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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PW Illustration/Ikon Images/Corbis

Link Between Heart Disease And Height Hidden In Our Genes

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