Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
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Richard Harris

A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Without including a "control group" of sepsis patients who get the usual mix of drugs and fluids, even a big study comparing two other experimental approaches won't deliver helpful answers, critics say. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk

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A researcher showed people a picture of The Thinker in an effort to study the link between analytical thinking and religious disbelief. In hindsight, the researcher called his study design "silly". The study could not be reproduced. Peter Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Barritt/Getty Images

In Psychology And Other Social Sciences, Many Studies Fail The Reproducibility Test

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Guidelines for cervical cancer screening have changed to allow HPV testing alone for women over 30. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

For Cervical Cancer Screening, Women Over 30 Can Now Choose The HPV Test Only

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Generic Version Of The EpiPen Is Approved For Allergic Reactions

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Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

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Lipitor, a best-seller as a cholesterol treatment, is being tested as a remedy for the flu. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Scientists Find New Tricks For Old Drugs

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Dr. Vinay Prasad is 35 and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, where he researches health policy, the high cost of drugs and evidence-based medicine. He has more than 21,000 followers on Twitter. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype

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In these two two-cell mouse embryos, the surface of the embryos is outlined in orange, the DNA in the nucleus is indicated in blue and the activity of the LINE-1 gene is indicated via bright red spots. Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF hide caption

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Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

When Scientists Develop Products From Personal Medical Data, Who Gets To Profit?

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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A tree toppled by Hurricane Maria rests over damaged graves in the Villa Palmeras cemetery in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in December 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Study Puts Puerto Rico Death Toll From Hurricane Maria Near 5,000

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Aimovig, a new kind of migraine drug, is injected once a month. The medicine reduced the number of migraines in clinical studies reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration. Amgen/AP hide caption

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Amgen/AP