Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Richard Harris 2010
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Richard Harris

CDC Announces First Case Of Ebola Diagnosed In U.S.

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Some potential new Ebola drugs will be tested at treatment centers like this one run by Doctors Without Borders near Monrovia. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Tests Of New Ebola Drugs Could Take Place As Early As November

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Dr. Harold Varmus, a Nobel Prize winner, cancer biologist and director of the National Cancer Institute. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Top Scientists Suggest A Few Fixes For Medical Funding Crisis

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Coalitions of patient advocates now help steer research funding toward particular projects. Lilli Carré for NPR hide caption

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Lilli Carré for NPR

Breast Cancer Patients Seek More Control Over Research Agenda

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Ian Glomski outside his home in Charlottesville, Va., where hops grow in his garden. He quit an academic career in microbiology to start a liquor distillery. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Victoria Ruiz (left), a postdoctoral fellow in immunology, works with Brianna Delgado, a high school student that she mentors, at the Blaser Lab, inside NYU's Langone Medical Center in New York, NY. Ramsay de Give for NPR hide caption

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Ramsay de Give for NPR

Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists

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Tom Murphy, 56, in his home in Gainesville, Va., was diagnosed with ALS four years ago. An experimental drug seems to have slowed the progression of his disease, he says, though most ALS patients aren't as lucky. T.J. Kirkpatrick for NPR hide caption

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T.J. Kirkpatrick for NPR

Patients Vulnerable When Cash-Strapped Scientists Cut Corners

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Built In Better Times, University Labs Now Lack Research Funding

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Randen Patterson left a research career in physiology at U.C. Davis when funding got too tight. He now owns a grocery store in Guinda, Calif. Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR hide caption

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Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR

When Scientists Give Up

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Leif Parsons for NPR

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

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Protective equipment is in short supply. Here, a Liberian burial team carefully disinfects its gloves before disposing of them. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Why Ebola Is Making It Harder To Provide Good Health Care

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A health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering an Ebola screening tent at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. More than 300 Sierra Leoneans have died of the disease. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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Michael Duff/AP

Even With $100 Million, WHO Says It Will Take Months To Control Ebola

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Why Is There No Drug To Treat Ebola?

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