Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Richard Harris 2010
Stories By

Richard Harris

A study of chemotherapy medicines produced by 10 companies found that, on average, each drug produced seven times as much revenue for its manufacturer as it cost in research and development. BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images

R&D Costs For Cancer Drugs Are Likely Much Less Than Industry Claims, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550135932/550218516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543402095/543583554" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
kimberrywood/Getty Images

A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542605039/542867110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535412346/535660708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michelle Flandez's son Inti Perez — pictured at home in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, in 2016 — was born with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Giusti/AP

A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/530224517/530769881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Turns out humans are better at smelling than you might think. CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images

Why Your Sense Of Smell Is Better Than You Might Think

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527750147/527990624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the risks of screening for thyroid cancer in people without symptoms outweigh the benefits. kaisersosa67/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
kaisersosa67/Getty Images

Don't Screen For Thyroid Cancer, Task Force Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527569291/527640499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523786179/523997690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523406710/523534116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522775456/523237803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray reads a statement to media members Friday, in Seattle. A lawsuit filed Thursday accuses Murray of sexually molesting a teenage high-school dropout in the 1980s. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521918863/522091724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nearly two-thirds of cell mutations that cause cancer are caused by random error, a study found. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521219318/521274761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521096488/521195963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript