Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
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Richard Harris

An analysis of air quality and childhood asthma in Los Angeles found that kids' health improved when smog declined. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

When LA's Air Got Better, Kids' Asthma Cases Dropped

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Smartphone App And Paper Funnel Could Help Diagnose Ear Infections

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Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children's Hospital, uses the experimental smartphone app and a paper funnel to check his daughter's ear. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

An MRI scan shows signs of atrophy in the brain of a patient with Huntington's disease. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Experimental Drug For Huntington's Disease Jams Malfunctioning Gene

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Even if a genetic test could reliably predict obesity risk, would people make effective use of the information? eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images

How Helpful Would A Genetic Test For Obesity Risk Be?

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As scientists learn more about the complex way genes combine and work together to create human traits, the idea of "designer babies" becomes less and less likely. BlackJack3D/Getty Images hide caption

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BlackJack3D/Getty Images

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done

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Will computers alienate us from the healing touch? Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

As Artificial Intelligence Moves Into Medicine, The Human Touch Could Be A Casualty

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Google is looking to artificial intelligence as a way to make a mark in health care. Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google Searches For Ways To Put Artificial Intelligence To Use In Health Care

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David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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Nurse practitioner Debra Brown guides patient Merdis Wells through a diabetic retinopathy exam at University Medical Center in New Orleans. Courtesy of IDx hide caption

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Courtesy of IDx

How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?

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The presence of the hepatitis C virus in donated hearts and organs for transplantation wasn't an impediment for a successful result for recipients. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images

Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds

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Amir Kiani (from left), Chloe O'Connell and Nishit Asnani troubleshoot an algorithm to diagnose tuberculosis in computer lab at Stanford University. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

How Can Doctors Be Sure A Self-Taught Computer Is Making The Right Diagnosis?

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"The optimist in me says in three years we can train this tool to read mammograms as well as an average radiologist," says Connie Lehman, chief of breast imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Training A Computer To Read Mammograms As Well As A Doctor

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Statisticians say it may not be wise to put all your eggs in the significance basket. intraprese/Getty Images hide caption

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intraprese/Getty Images

Statisticians' Call To Arms: Reject Significance And Embrace Uncertainty!

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