Ina Jaffe Ina Jaffe is a National Desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Culver City, California.
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Ina Jaffe

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Ina Jeffe
Jennifer Cawley/NPR

Ina Jaffe

Correspondent, National Desk

Ina Jaffe is a veteran NPR correspondent covering the aging of America. Her stories on Morning Edition and All Things Considered have focused on older adults' involvement in politics and elections, dating and divorce, work and retirement, fashion and sports, as well as issues affecting long term care and end of life choices. In 2015, she was named one of the nation's top "Influencers in Aging" by PBS publication Next Avenue, which wrote "Jaffe has reinvented reporting on aging."

Jaffe also reports on politics, contributing to NPR's coverage of national elections since 2008. From her base at NPR's production center in Culver City, California, Jaffe has covered most of the region's major news events, from the beating of Rodney King to the election of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. She's also developed award-winning enterprise pieces. Her 2012 investigation into how the West Los Angeles VA made millions from illegally renting vacant property while ignoring plans to house homeless veterans won an award from the Society of Professional Journalists as well as a Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media. A few months after the story aired, the West Los Angeles VA broke ground on supportive housing for homeless vets.

Her year-long coverage on the rising violence in California's public psychiatric hospitals won the 2011 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award as well as a Gracie Award. Her 2010 series on California's tough three strikes law was honored by the American Bar Association with the Silver Gavel Award, as well as by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon, which made its debut in 1985.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe attended the University of Wisconsin and DePaul University, receiving bachelor's and master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

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From 2012 through 2016, federal health inspectors cited 87% of U.S. hospices for deficiencies. And 20% had lapses serious enough to endanger patients, according to two new reports from the HHS Inspector General's Office. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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HHS Inspector General Finds Serious Flaws In 20% Of U.S. Hospice Programs

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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8-Year-Old Migrant Boy Dies In U.S. Custody

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Wildfire Cut Their Grieving Short, Now Residents Of Thousand Oaks Remember Victims

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National Park Service Assesses Loss On Federal Lands Burned By Woolsey Fire

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Thousand Oaks Remembers Shooting Victims

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Rep. Denham's Immigration Stance May Charm Latino Voters

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Ammar Campa-Najjar, who is running against Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter, speaks to reporters outside the San Diego Federal Courthouse during Hunter's arraignment hearing in August. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter, Under Indictment, Launches False Attacks On Opponent

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Jimmy Lockett thought he was born in Louisiana but discovered he was born in Memphis when he applied for his state photo ID. Johnathon Kelso hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso

For Older Voters, Getting The Right ID Can Be Especially Tough

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Building 209 is the only building so far renovated to house chronically homeless veterans at the VA West Los Angeles Medical Center campus. The nearly 400 acres of the VA West Los Angeles Medical Center were donated in the 19th century to be a home for old and disabled soldiers. The land hasn't been used that way in decades. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Overcoming A Shameful Past, VA Plans Haven For Homeless Vets In West Los Angeles

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About a decade ago, the FDA started requiring drugmakers to add black box warnings to labels and prescribing information for Seroquel and other antipsychotic drugs. The agency made the change after the medications were linked to an increased risk of death among elderly dementia patients. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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'Dear Doctor' Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing

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Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Marsha Hunt played a maid who penned a tell-all memoir opposite Richard Carlson in the 1942 romantic comedy The Affairs Of Martha. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Actress Marsha Hunt, 100, Has Matters Of Principle

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