Ina Jaffe Ina Jaffe is a National Desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Culver City, California.
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Ina Jaffe

It's Not Clear What Single-Payer Health Care Would Mean For Older Workers

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California To Officially Apologize To Japanese Americans Over Internment

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What People Throughout The Country Thought About Trump's Impeachment Acquittal

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California Rep. Duncan Hunter To Plead Guilty To Campaign Finance Charge

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The White House Says Nursing Home Regulations Are Too Tough

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The CAPABLE program provides therapy but also offers up practical solutions to help make navigating the home easier. Sarah Szanton (left) got the idea for CAPABLE when she was a nurse practitioner treating homebound seniors. Courtesy of the Heinz Awards hide caption

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Courtesy of the Heinz Awards

Program Offers TLC To Older Adults And Their Homes So They Can Stay Put

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How Rep. Adam Schiff Got To A Place Where He's Leading The Impeachment Inquiry

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Finding Affordable Senior Housing Is A Challenge For Many Americans. Here's Why

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Navigating The New Realities Of Work And Retirement

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Bob Orozco, 89, has been in fitness his entire adult life. He began working for the Laguna Niguel YMCA in 1984 and leads the Silver Sneakers Club, a free fitness program for Medicare beneficiaries. "I probably will work until something stops me," Orozco says. Morgan Baker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Baker for NPR

From 2012 through 2016, federal health inspectors cited 87% of U.S. hospices for deficiencies. And 20% had lapses serious enough to endanger patients, according to two new reports from the HHS Inspector General's Office. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General Finds Serious Flaws In 20% Of U.S. Hospice Programs

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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