Ina Jaffe Ina Jaffe is a National desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Culver City, Calif.
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Ina Jaffe

Hawaii ranks 49th in the nation for use of home health care services during the last six months of someone's life. Videos from ACP Decisions show patients what their options are at the end of life. ACP Decisions hide caption

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ACP Decisions

Videos On End-Of-Life Choices Ease Tough Conversation

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Richard Glatzer, Indie Film Director Behind 'Still Alice,' Dies

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Janice Ledtke and Pacho Lane chat during a speed dating event in The Age of Love. Courtesy of Free Play Pictures hide caption

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Courtesy of Free Play Pictures

Speed Dating For Seniors Who Aren't Interested In Slowing Down

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Caregivers who are trained in responding to anxiety or aggression in people with dementia can effectively reduce those symptoms, studies find. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Behavioral Therapy Helps More Than Drugs For Dementia Patients

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About 1 in 3 patients with dementia who live in nursing homes are being sedated with antipsychotic drugs, the GAO says. Outside nursing homes, about 1 in 7 dementia patients are getting the risky drugs. Wladimir Bulgar/iStockphoto hide caption

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Wladimir Bulgar/iStockphoto

GAO Report Urges Fewer Antipsychotic Drugs For Dementia Patients

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Despite his ALS diagnosis, Richard Glatzer (right) says he was on set every day during the filming of Still Alice. Jojo Whilden/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Jojo Whilden/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

In 'Still Alice,' Director Couple Tells A Story That Mirrors Their Own

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After Years Of Wrangling, VA To Provide Vets Housing On West LA Campus

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House Rule On Social Security Funding Causes Controversy

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AARP Members Tour Cutting Edge Tech Show

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How 'The Interview' May Change How Big Studios Do Business

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More than a quarter of the victims of financial fraud are over 60. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Services Offer A Means To Foil Widespread 'Elder Fraud'

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Marian Grunwald (from left), Earl Elfstrom and Verna Matheson bounced a balloon back and forth with nursing assistant Rick Pavlisich on Dec. 13, 2013, at an Ecumen nursing home in Chisago City, Minn. Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul hide caption

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Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul

This Nursing Home Calms Troubling Behavior Without Risky Drugs

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NPR's analysis of government data found that harsh penalties are almost never used when nursing home residents get unnecessary drugs of any kind. Owen Franken/Corbis hide caption

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Owen Franken/Corbis

Nursing Homes Rarely Penalized For Oversedating Patients

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Antipsychotic drugs aren't necessary in the vast majority of dementia cases, gerontologists say. The pills can be stupefying and greatly raise the risk of falls — and hip fracture. iStockphoto hide caption

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Old And Overmedicated: The Real Drug Problem In Nursing Homes

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