Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
Stories By

Christopher Joyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Christopher Joyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Christopher Joyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

For several years, Joyce was an editor and correspondent for NPR's Radio Expeditions, a documentary program on natural history and disappearing cultures produced in collaboration with the National Geographic Society that was heard frequently on Morning Edition.

Joyce came to NPR in 1993 as a part-time editor while finishing a book about tropical rainforests and, as he says, "I just fell in love with radio." For two years, Joyce worked on NPR's national desk and was responsible for NPR's Western coverage. But his interest in science and technology soon launched him into parallel work on NPR's science desk.

In addition, Joyce has written two non-fiction books on scientific topics for the popular market: Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with co-author Eric Stover); and Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest.

Before coming to NPR, Joyce worked for ten years as the U.S. correspondent and editor for the British weekly magazine New Scientist.

Joyce's stories on forensic investigations into the massacres in Kosovo and Bosnia were part of NPR's war coverage that won a 1999 Overseas Press Club award. He was part of the Radio Expeditions reporting and editing team that won the 2001 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University journalism award and the 2001 Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Joyce won the 2001 American Association for the Advancement of Science excellence in journalism award.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Why Scientists Are Talking About Attribution Science And What It Is

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/675382734/675382735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thick clouds emanate from a coal-burning power plant in Baishan, in the Jilin province of China. In an effort to boost its economy, China has recently started greenlighting coal projects that had been on hold. Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673821051/673857945" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nearly 200 Countries Meet In Poland To Participate In Climate Conference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673022530/673022537" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volunteers search a mobile home park in Paradise, Calif. Government scientists predict wildfires like the one that struck this community will contribute to billions in losses for the U.S. economy. Kathleen Ronayne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kathleen Ronayne/AP

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666951838/667118419" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The skull of a mosasaur, one segment of a full-scale reconstruction, is displayed in front of a mural painted by natural history artist Karen Carr, depicting the mosasaur's underwater environment. Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Madeleine Cook/NPR

Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/659551721/665547210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The oldest figurative painting, found in caves at the far eastern edge of the island of Borneo, depicts a wild cow with horns and dates to at least 40,000 years ago — thousands of years older than figurative paintings found in Europe. Luc-Henri Fage/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
Luc-Henri Fage/Nature

Indonesian Caves Hold Oldest Figurative Painting Ever Found, Scientists Say

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/664850289/665940336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) rangers display ivory seized from poachers around the country. KWS has played a critical role in carrying out operations against poachers. Simon Maina/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Maina/Getty Images

DNA Test Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/649546126/649626085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What Hurricane Florence Tells Us About Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/647559489/647559493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Cooper/Getty Images

To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/643342003/643445940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland on March 30, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/641285739/641359769" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636845604/640329327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript