Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
Stories By

Christopher Joyce

Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499453623/499637494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This image taken in 2012 shows part of the Crosson Ice Shelf (center left) and Mount Murphy (foreground) on the western edge of Antarctica. Thwaites Ice Shelf lies beyond the highly fractured expanse of ice (center). John Sonntag/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
John Sonntag/Nature

Antarctica's Ice Sheets Are Melting Faster — And From Beneath

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499206005/499343653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Capuchin monkeys use a detached flake as an active hammerstone, possibly in order to produce quartz dust. M.Haslam/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
M.Haslam/Nature

Those Ancient Stone Tools — Did Humans Make Them, Or Was It Really Monkeys?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498421284/498582246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Energy And Climate Change, Clinton And Trump Differ Sharply

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498219475/498219476" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Matthew Set To End U.S. Hurricane Drought After 10 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497079283/497079284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Research Zeroes In On Sources Of Methane-Emissions Uptick

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/496826383/496826384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cattle had to be driven through the waters of a flooded road and then trucked to higher ground on Aug. 16 in Sorrento, La. About a third of the flooding in the state last month occurred outside the local flood plain. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Outdated FEMA Flood Maps Don't Account For Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492260099/494043702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488523371/491242782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490628323/490671365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., in June hold signs calling for hearings on contamination in their town's drinking water by a chemical related to firefighting foam. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Groll/AP

A view of the main trench to the permanent camp at Camp Century, Greenland, in the 1950s. The U.S. Army base was abandoned in 1967, after Greenland's ice sheet began shifting and the Army realized that the tunnels wouldn't last. Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Melting Ice In Greenland Could Expose Serious Pollutants From Buried Army Base

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488872411/488881347" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Morne de Klerk/Getty Images

Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486655867/486664046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript