Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

Volunteers search a mobile home park in Paradise, Calif. Government scientists predict wildfires like the one that struck this community will contribute to billions in losses for the U.S. economy. Kathleen Ronayne/AP hide caption

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Kathleen Ronayne/AP

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

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The skull of a mosasaur, one segment of a full-scale reconstruction, is displayed in front of a mural painted by natural history artist Karen Carr, depicting the mosasaur's underwater environment. Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

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The oldest figurative painting, found in caves at the far eastern edge of the island of Borneo, depicts a wild cow with horns and dates to at least 40,000 years ago — thousands of years older than figurative paintings found in Europe. Luc-Henri Fage/Nature hide caption

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Luc-Henri Fage/Nature

Indonesian Caves Hold Oldest Figurative Painting Ever Found, Scientists Say

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Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) rangers display ivory seized from poachers around the country. KWS has played a critical role in carrying out operations against poachers. Simon Maina/Getty Images hide caption

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DNA Test Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

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What Hurricane Florence Tells Us About Climate Change

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As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

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To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

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Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland on March 30, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

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Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

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Karin Bruwelheide handles an amputates limb that dates back to the Civil War. The bones were discovered by scientists at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History have been analyzing the bones to learn more about them and who they may have belonged to. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat Surgeons

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