Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

The devastation from Hurricane Michael over Mexico Beach, Fla. A massive federal report released in November warns that climate change is fueling extreme weather disasters like hurricanes and wildfires. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Examining The Link Between Climate And Weather

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Scientists Say Miniature Flies Are A Big Worry For Antarctic Island

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Why Scientists Are Talking About Attribution Science And What It Is

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Thick clouds emanate from a coal-burning power plant in Baishan, in the Jilin province of China. In an effort to boost its economy, China has recently started greenlighting coal projects that had been on hold. Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

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Nearly 200 Countries Meet In Poland To Participate In Climate Conference

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Volunteers search a mobile home park in Paradise, Calif. Government scientists predict wildfires like the one that struck this community will contribute to billions in losses for the U.S. economy. Kathleen Ronayne/AP hide caption

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Kathleen Ronayne/AP

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

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The skull of a mosasaur, one segment of a full-scale reconstruction, is displayed in front of a mural painted by natural history artist Karen Carr, depicting the mosasaur's underwater environment. Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

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The oldest figurative painting, found in caves at the far eastern edge of the island of Borneo, depicts a wild cow with horns and dates to at least 40,000 years ago — thousands of years older than figurative paintings found in Europe. Luc-Henri Fage/Nature hide caption

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Luc-Henri Fage/Nature

Indonesian Caves Hold Oldest Figurative Painting Ever Found, Scientists Say

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Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) rangers display ivory seized from poachers around the country. KWS has played a critical role in carrying out operations against poachers. Simon Maina/Getty Images hide caption

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DNA Test Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

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What Hurricane Florence Tells Us About Climate Change

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As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

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To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

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