Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

Some In Corporate America Push Back On Trump's Climate Regulations Roll Back

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Trump's Plan To Ditch Clean Power Plan Threatens Paris Agreement

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

More than 10 wildfires burned over 200,000 acres in Southern California in October 2003, many of them started by humans. This satellite image shows strong winds carrying smoke over the Pacific. MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA hide caption

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MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA

What's The Leading Cause Of Wildfires In The U.S.? Humans

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Atmospheric rivers are sinews of moisture from the tropics. The one pictured here appeared over the Northern Pacific on Jan. 3. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

New Research Shows How 'Atmospheric Rivers' Wreak Havoc Around The Globe

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Tiny, shrimplike amphipods living in the Mariana Trench were contaminated at levels similar to those found in crabs living in waters fed by one of China's most polluted rivers. Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University hide caption

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Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

Pollution Has Worked Its Way Down To The World's Deepest Waters

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Government scientists are working on a climate assessment that among other things will help predict "sunny day" floods like this one in Miami Beach, Fla., in 2015. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Huge Federal Climate Enterprise At Stake As Trump Team Moves In

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Research Finds Evidence Of Coastal Buffer Weakening U.S. Hurricanes

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A natural gas drilling rig's lights shimmer in the evening light near Silt, Colo. Methane is the main component of natural gas, and studies show some methane escapes from leaky oil and gas operations. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Methane's On The Rise, But Regulations To Stop Gas Leaks Still Debated

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Elephant tusks totaling about 15 tons are set on fire during an anti-poaching ceremony at Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya, in March 2015. Conservationists say a pledge by China to stop the ivory trade is a possible game-changer in the struggle to curb the slaughter of elephants. Khalil Senosi/AP hide caption

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Khalil Senosi/AP

China Says It Will Shut Down Its Ivory Trade in 2017

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Temperatures are up and ice cover is down in the Arctic this year. Scientists say climate change is altering the region faster than other parts of the planet. Greenland Travel via Flickr hide caption

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Greenland Travel via Flickr

Arctic Is Warming At 'Astonishing' Rates, Researchers Say

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The U.S. government is a major contributor to climate research. It funds missions like NASA's 2010 ICESCAPE expedition to study the decline of Arctic sea ice. Kathryn Hansen/NASA hide caption

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Kathryn Hansen/NASA

Trump's Election Leaves Scientists In A Climate Of Uncertainty

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A man clears the debris from a destroyed convenience store in Rosalie, Ala., on Thursday, the day after a reported tornado struck the area. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Tornado Outbreaks Are On The Rise, And Scientists Don't Know Why

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Climate Scientists Struggle To Identify Cause Of Bigger Tornado Clusters

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Environmental groups are preparing to sue President-elect Donald Trump's administration in federal court if it tries to eliminate eco-rules. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Environmentalists Gird For Battle With A Trump Administration

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