Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

An illustration from 1870 shows Prehistoric men using wooden clubs and stone axe to fend off an attacks by a large cave bear. The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) was a species of bear that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene and became extinct at the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum, about 27,500 years ago. Mammoths can be seen in the background. British Library/Science Source hide caption

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British Library/Science Source

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To Extinction

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The Thomas Fire advanced toward Santa Barbara County on Dec. 10, 2017, in Carpinteria, Calif. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

As Climate Costs Grow, Some See A Moneymaking Opportunity

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A new satellite, called MethaneSAT,will track methane emissions from oil and gas fields, as well as agriculture and natural sources. It's due for launch in three years. Environmental Defense Fund hide caption

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Environmental Defense Fund

A prep cook at a San Francisco restaurant drops fish skin into a food scrap recycling container. Turning food waste into fertilizer is popular in parts of Europe and is catching on in the U.S. But tiny plastics are also making their way into that fertilizer — and into the food chain. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Another Place Plastics Are Turning Up: Organic Fertilizer From Food Waste

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The Great Pacific Garbage 'Patch' Much Bigger Than Previously Thought

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Flooding in Boston's North End during a nor'easter storm on Friday. A new government report suggests floods will become more common over the next century. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

New Report Predicts Rising Tides, More Flooding

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Left: Dirk Hoffmann and Alistair Pike sample calcite from a calcite crust on top of the red scalariform sign in La Pasiega.Right: Drawing of Panel 78 in La Pasiega by Breuil et al.(1913). The red scalariform (ladder) symbol has a minimum age of 64,000 years but it is unclear if the animals and other symbols were painted later. J. Zilhão (left) / Breuil et al. (1913)/Science Advances hide caption

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J. Zilhão (left) / Breuil et al. (1913)/Science Advances

Cave Art May Have Been Handiwork Of Neanderthals

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Humpback whales are among the animals that could be affected by seismic surveys for oil and gas. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine Life

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Waves crash onto the beach near Brighton Pier in England, in January 2007. Gale force winds and heavy rain brought disruption to large parts of the country. Severe weather events like this one may be linked to more frequent fluctuations in the polar jet stream, according to a new study. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Hurricane Harvey put vast swaths of Texas under water. Elsewhere, fires, tornadoes and extreme weather caused hundreds of billions in damages. Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images

New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 Billion

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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