Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

President Trump Expected To Make Decision On Paris Climate Accord

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Market Forces May Impact Emissions More Than Climate Agreements

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UMCES chemist Michael Gonsior gathers water samples from Cocktown Creek in Maryland. Andrew Heyes/Courtesy of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science hide caption

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Andrew Heyes/Courtesy of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Trump's Budget Would Eliminate A Key Funder Of Research On Coastal Pollution

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Cars line up at the south entrance to Zion National Park in Utah, bringing with them the urban soundscape. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

America's Protected Natural Areas Are Polluted, By Noise

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Coal is piled up at the Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Environmentalists, Coal Companies Rally Around Technology To Clean Up Coal

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(Left) A close-up view of a spirally fractured mastodon femur. (Right) A boulder discovered at the Cerutti Mastodon site in San Diego County thought to have been used by early humans as a hammerstone. Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum hide caption

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Tom Démeré/San Diego Natural History Museum

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought

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Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana. However, cutthroat trout populations are threatened by hybridization from mating with rainbow trout. Jonny Armstrong/USGS hide caption

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Jonny Armstrong/USGS

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout

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NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

More than 10 wildfires burned over 200,000 acres in Southern California in October 2003, many of them started by humans. This satellite image shows strong winds carrying smoke over the Pacific. MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA hide caption

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MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA

What's The Leading Cause Of Wildfires In The U.S.? Humans

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Atmospheric rivers are sinews of moisture from the tropics. The one pictured here appeared over the Northern Pacific on Jan. 3. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

New Research Shows How 'Atmospheric Rivers' Wreak Havoc Around The Globe

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Tiny, shrimplike amphipods living in the Mariana Trench were contaminated at levels similar to those found in crabs living in waters fed by one of China's most polluted rivers. Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University hide caption

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Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

Pollution Has Worked Its Way Down To The World's Deepest Waters

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