Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

One of the frigatebirds that researchers tagged soared 40 miles over the Indian Ocean without a wing-flap. These birds were photographed in the Galapagos. Lucy Rickards/Flickr hide caption

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Lucy Rickards/Flickr

Nonstop Flight: How The Frigatebird Can Soar For Weeks Without Stopping

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Moraine Park is a grassy valley inside Rocky Mountain National Park. Wes Lindamood/NPR hide caption

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Wes Lindamood/NPR

Beyond Sightseeing: You'll Love The Sound Of America's Best Parks

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Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

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Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

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Among the hominin fossils found at the Mata Menge site on the Indonesian island of Flores was part of a lower jaw. Kinez Riza/Nature hide caption

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Kinez Riza/Nature

Fossils Suggest That Island Life Shrank Our 'Hobbit' Relatives

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Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

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Etienne FABRE - SSAC

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build

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A view from the Shark Valley Visitors Center in Everglades National Park. Much of the freshwater that used to replenish South Florida's saw grass prairie has been diverted to agriculture, researchers say. Pietro Valocchi/Flickr hide caption

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Pietro Valocchi/Flickr

Rising Seas Push Too Much Salt Into The Florida Everglades

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The mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., worries that the continued rise in sea levels could sink the property values of waterfront neighborhoods. PictureWendy/Flickr hide caption

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PictureWendy/Flickr

Rising Sea Levels Made This Republican Mayor A Climate Change Believer

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Sauropods were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth. New research helps explain why. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

Superhearing And Fast Growth ... Scientists Learn Why Sauropods Ruled

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On Earth Day, Nations To Sign Off On Historic Climate Pact

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President Obama met with China's president, Xi Jinping, at an event linked to the international climate conference held late last year outside Paris. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Can The U.S. And China Keep Their Climate Pledges?

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People in Boston enjoyed a late winter heat wave this past March. In much of the U.S., climate change is causing winters to warm faster than summers. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Climate Change? Some People May Not Be Sweating It Because The Weather Is Nicer

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Large cracks in the sidewalk in Coyle, Okla., appeared after several earthquakes on Jan. 24. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

U.S. Geology Maps Reveal Areas Vulnerable To Man-Made Quakes

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For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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Dave Umberger/AP

To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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The half-naked hatchetfish, shown here munching on a shrimp, is just one of many billions of mesopelagic ocean fish that migrate up and down the water column each day to hunt food and avoid predators. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Mysterious Ocean Buzz Traced To Daily Fish Migration

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A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source

Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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