Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

Anne Schauer-Gimenez (from left) Allison Pieja and Molly Morse of Mango Materials stand next to the biopolymer fermenter at a sewage treatment plant next to San Francisco Bay. The fermenter feeds bacteria the methane they need to produce a biological form of plastic. Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Replacing Plastic: Can Bacteria Help Us Break The Habit?

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The deep ocean is filled with sea creatures like giant larvaceans. They're actually the size of tadpoles, but they're surrounded by a yard-wide bubble of mucus that collects food — and plastic. Courtesy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Microplastics Have Invaded The Deep Ocean — And The Food Chain

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An artist's rendering of the mass extinction of life that occurred toward the end of the Permian Period, about 250 million years ago. Lynette Cook/Science Source hide caption

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Lynette Cook/Science Source

The 'Great Dying' Nearly Erased Life On Earth. Scientists See Similarities To Today

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Debris blankets the north side of one of the Cocos Keeling Islands in the Indian Ocean. Researchers found a huge amount of plastic both onshore and buried in the sand. Courtesy of Silke Stuckenbrock hide caption

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Courtesy of Silke Stuckenbrock

Remote Island Chain Has Few People — But Hundreds Of Millions Of Pieces Of Plastic

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The Xiahe mandible was originally found in 1980 in Baishiya Karst Cave. Researchers say the bone is 160,000 years old and came from a Denisovan. Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University hide caption

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Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University

Denisovans, A Mysterious Kind Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced To Tibet

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A team of researchers found a surprisingly large amount of microplastic in the air in the Pyrenees mountains in southern France. VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains

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The pronounced curve of this toe bone — the proximal phalanx — from a specimen of Homo luzonensis, an early human found in a Philippine cave, looks more like it came from tree-climbing Australopithecus than from a modern human, scientists say. Callao Cave Archaeology Project hide caption

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Callao Cave Archaeology Project

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History

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The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

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The U.S. used to ship about 7 million tons of plastic trash to China a year, where much of it was recycled into raw materials. Then came the Chinese crackdown of 2018. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Where Will Your Plastic Trash Go Now That China Doesn't Want It?

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A rare photo of "type D" killer whales off South Georgia island, located between South America and Antarctica, shows the whales' blunt heads and tiny white eye patches. Courtesy of J.P. Sylvestre hide caption

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Courtesy of J.P. Sylvestre

Mysterious Type Of Killer Whale, Sought After For Years, Found In Southern Ocean

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Around the globe, people are searching for ways to reduce plastic waste. Above: Dampalit, a fishing community in Manila Bay, can't keep up with a constant influx of trash. Jes Aznar for NPR hide caption

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Jes Aznar for NPR

Earth's long-term warming, compared against a base line average from 1951 to 1980, can be seen in this visualization of NASA's global temperature record. Kathryn Mersmann/NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio hide caption

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Kathryn Mersmann/NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

A curious harbor seal checks out diver Mike Weber as he and other divers pick up golf balls in the waters off the coast of Northern California. His daughter wrote a paper about all the golf balls found in the ocean from nearby golf courses. Courtesy of Alex Weber hide caption

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Courtesy of Alex Weber

Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

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Movement To Find Alternative To Plastic Packaging Grows In Philippines

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A Small Plastic Package Is A Big Culprit Of The Waste Filling Oceans

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