Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

Obama And Xi Emerge From Meeting With Big-Ticket Promise On Climate

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How Sound Shaped The Evolution Of Your Brain

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Squirrels closely mimic bird warning calls and help spread the alarm through the forest that hawks, owls or other predators are nearby. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Squirrels Mimic Bird Alarms To Foil The Enemy

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Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Oelman

Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

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African forest elephants stampede in the Central African Republic jungle. Courtesy of Cornell Lab or Ornithology hide caption

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Courtesy of Cornell Lab or Ornithology

To Decode Elephant Conversation, You Must Feel The Jungle Rumble

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Humpback whales and tanker in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts Bay. Green Fire Productions/Flickr hide caption

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Green Fire Productions/Flickr

Listening To Whale Migration Reveals A Sea Of Noise Pollution, Too

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Humpback whale and calf, off the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico. Reinhard Dirscherl/Look-foto/Corbis hide caption

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Reinhard Dirscherl/Look-foto/Corbis

It Took A Musician's Ear To Decode The Complex Song In Whale Calls

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

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3-D renderings of four skeletons found buried near the altar of an early church in the Jamestown settlement in Virginia. Smithsonian X 3D hide caption

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Smithsonian X 3D

Bones In Church Ruins Likely The Remains Of Early Jamestown's Elite

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The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared. David J. Meltzer/Science hide caption

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David J. Meltzer/Science

2 Gene Studies Suggest First Migrants To Americas A Complex Mix

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Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

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A plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. in January 2015. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole/AP

Supreme Court Rules In Industry's Favor. What's EPA's Next Move?

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A Maasai boy and his dog, near the skeleton of an elephant killed by poachers outside of Arusha, Tanzania, in 2013. Jason Straziuso/AP hide caption

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Jason Straziuso/AP

DNA Tracking Of Ivory Helps Biologists Find Poaching Hotspots

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This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, who died about 8,500 years ago in what's now southeast Washington, was based on forensic scientists' study of the morphological features of his skull. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

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Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod. Courtesy of Chris Tremblay hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

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