Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
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Christopher Joyce

Cattle had to be driven through the waters of a flooded road and then trucked to higher ground on Aug. 16 in Sorrento, La. About a third of the flooding in the state last month occurred outside the local flood plain. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Outdated FEMA Flood Maps Don't Account For Climate Change

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Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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Protesters in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., in June hold signs calling for hearings on contamination in their town's drinking water by a chemical related to firefighting foam. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

A view of the main trench to the permanent camp at Camp Century, Greenland, in the 1950s. The U.S. Army base was abandoned in 1967, after Greenland's ice sheet began shifting and the Army realized that the tunnels wouldn't last. Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Melting Ice In Greenland Could Expose Serious Pollutants From Buried Army Base

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A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

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Morne de Klerk/Getty Images

Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

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NASA Scientists Predict Another All-Time Heat Record For 2016

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One of the frigatebirds that researchers tagged soared 40 miles over the Indian Ocean without a wing-flap. These birds were photographed in the Galapagos. Lucy Rickards/Flickr hide caption

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Lucy Rickards/Flickr

Nonstop Flight: How The Frigatebird Can Soar For Weeks Without Stopping

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Moraine Park is a grassy valley inside Rocky Mountain National Park. Wes Lindamood/NPR hide caption

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Wes Lindamood/NPR

Beyond Sightseeing: You'll Love The Sound Of America's Best Parks

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Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

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Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

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Among the hominin fossils found at the Mata Menge site on the Indonesian island of Flores was part of a lower jaw. Kinez Riza/Nature hide caption

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Kinez Riza/Nature

Fossils Suggest That Island Life Shrank Our 'Hobbit' Relatives

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Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

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Etienne FABRE - SSAC

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build

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A view from the Shark Valley Visitors Center in Everglades National Park. Much of the freshwater that used to replenish South Florida's saw grass prairie has been diverted to agriculture, researchers say. Pietro Valocchi/Flickr hide caption

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Pietro Valocchi/Flickr

Rising Seas Push Too Much Salt Into The Florida Everglades

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The mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., worries that the continued rise in sea levels could sink the property values of waterfront neighborhoods. PictureWendy/Flickr hide caption

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PictureWendy/Flickr

Rising Sea Levels Made This Republican Mayor A Climate Change Believer

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