Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Christopher Joyce 2010
Stories By

Christopher Joyce

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) rangers display ivory seized from poachers around the country. KWS has played a critical role in carrying out operations against poachers. Simon Maina/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Maina/Getty Images

DNA Test Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/649546126/649626085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What Hurricane Florence Tells Us About Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/647559489/647559493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Cooper/Getty Images

To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/643342003/643445940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland on March 30, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/641285739/641359769" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636845604/640329327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627505327/631742154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Karin Bruwelheide handles an amputates limb that dates back to the Civil War. The bones were discovered by scientists at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History have been analyzing the bones to learn more about them and who they may have belonged to. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Civil War Battlefield 'Limb Pit' Reveals Work Of Combat Surgeons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/620394034/621744121" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists have videotaped sharks traveling a 500-mile-long "shark highway" in the Pacific Ocean. Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico

Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611955569/614518653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611716731/611869669" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An infrared satellite image shows Hurricane Harvey just prior to making landfall on Aug. 25, 2017. Warm water in the Gulf of Mexico fed heavy rains, according to new research. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

The biggest fingerling salmon in this Alaskan fish hatchery are likely born to the biggest mothers. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She Has

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609907057/610161941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript