Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Doby Photography /NPR
Christopher Joyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Christopher Joyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

For several years, Joyce was an editor and correspondent for NPR's Radio Expeditions, a documentary program on natural history and disappearing cultures produced in collaboration with the National Geographic Society that was heard frequently on Morning Edition.

Joyce came to NPR in 1993 as a part-time editor while finishing a book about tropical rainforests and, as he says, "I just fell in love with radio." For two years, Joyce worked on NPR's national desk and was responsible for NPR's Western coverage. But his interest in science and technology soon launched him into parallel work on NPR's science desk.

In addition, Joyce has written two non-fiction books on scientific topics for the popular market: Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with co-author Eric Stover); and Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest.

Before coming to NPR, Joyce worked for ten years as the U.S. correspondent and editor for the British weekly magazine New Scientist.

Joyce's stories on forensic investigations into the massacres in Kosovo and Bosnia were part of NPR's war coverage that won a 1999 Overseas Press Club award. He was part of the Radio Expeditions reporting and editing team that won the 2001 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University journalism award and the 2001 Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Joyce won the 2001 American Association for the Advancement of Science excellence in journalism award.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Waves crash onto the beach near Brighton Pier in England, in January 2007. Gale force winds and heavy rain brought disruption to large parts of the country. Severe weather events like this one may be linked to more frequent fluctuations in the polar jet stream, according to a new study. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Hurricane Harvey put vast swaths of Texas under water. Elsewhere, fires, tornadoes and extreme weather caused hundreds of billions in damages. Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images

New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 Billion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576543677/576566480" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

toggle caption
Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/575326694/575450297" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Harvey, Texans Are Preparing For Future With Raised Homes, Private Flood Gates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573628710/573628711" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why Some Cities Are Better Than Others At Avoiding Gridlock

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572509857/572509874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Melt ponds dot a stretch of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland. This year was the Arctic's second-warmest in at least 1,500 years, after 2016. Nathan Kurtz/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Nathan Kurtz/NASA

Arctic's Temperature Continues To Run Hot, Latest 'Report Card' Shows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/570119468/570248853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Satellite imagery of the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 8, as three hurricanes (Katia, Irma, and Jose) are on the move. NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen

This Year's Hurricane Season Was Intense. Is It A Taste Of The Future?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568329677/568393504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The suns sets as an iceberg floats in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, where glaciers have been melting. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

The Sea Level Threat To Cities Depends On Where The Ice Melts — Not Just How Fast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566280048/566387415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A family evacuated their apartment complex in west Houston, where high water coming from the Addicks Reservoir flooded the area after Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30th. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Scientists Glimpse Houston's Flooded Future In Updated Rainfall Data

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564941990/565506551" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Climate conference attendees in Bonn, Germany, see a representation of Earth's climate trends. Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty Images

As Climate Negotiators Debate Nations' Pledges, Scientists Worry It's Not Enough

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564384950/564538218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hurricane Harvey dropped record rainfall on Houston neighborhoods like this one, near Addicks Reservoir. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David J. Phillip/AP

Scientists In Houston Tell A Story Of Concrete, Rain And Destruction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563016223/563019865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hurricane Harvey delivered record rainfall to East Texas. Many scientists believe that climate change helped to make the storm wetter. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Massive Government Report Says Climate Is Warming And Humans Are The Cause

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561608576/561671280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What Would Aliens Make Of NASA's Voyager?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554698413/554698422" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript