Carrie Kahn Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Latino USA.

Mexico Gets First Independent Gas Station In Over 75 Years

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Expanded Panama Canal Debuts At A Difficult Time For International Shipping

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As Panama Canal Expands, Many In The Country Feel Left Out Of Its Windfalls

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Aerial view showing the new Panama Canal expansion at the Gatun Locks in Colon, Panama. Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela is set to host an inauguration ceremony of Panama's newly expanded canal on Sunday. Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images

A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

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Rolando Arrieta/NPR

Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

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Highway 101: A Trip Down One Of Mexico's Most Dangerous Roads

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In Mexico, Candidates Sling Serious Mud In Tamaulipas

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Surge Of Central American Migrants To U.S. Could Rival 2014 Wave

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Mexico's President Proposes Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage Nationwide

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The head of the Panama Canal Authority, Jorge Quijano, center, opens the main valve to allow water into the flood chambers on the new set of locks on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal in June 2015. The expansion of the canal, making it wider and deeper to accommodate larger ships, has taken nearly a decade. It opens next month. Tito Herrera/AP hide caption

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Tito Herrera/AP

A Wider, Deeper Panama Canal Prepares To Open Its Locks

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed

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Panel Accuses Mexico Of Torturing Suspects In Missing Students Probe

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Fidel Castro, with his brother Raúl, addresses delegates on the last day of the 7th Congress of the Communist Party of Cuba, in Havana. Ismael Francisco/AP hide caption

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Ismael Francisco/AP

At Party Congress, Fidel Castro Speaks Of His Mortality

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Cuban President Raúl Castro (left), Commander of the Revolution Ramiro Valdés (center) and Cuban Vice President Miguel Díaz-Canel sit side by side at the Artemisa Mausoleum monument in July 2014. Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images