Carrie Kahn Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Latino USA.

Drought Conditions Wreak Havoc On Latin America

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Mexico Swears In A New Police Force, But Many Aren't Impressed

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A motorcyclist drives past a mural of revolutionary heroes in Managua, Nicaragua. Most streets in the country don't have names. People give directions by using reference points, mostly Lake Managua, when in the capital. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Navigating Nicaragua: A Lesson In Getting Lost

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A family swims in Lake Nicaragua, which will encompass nearly half of the proposed canal's 172-mile route. Environmentalists worry that oil spills, pollution and dredging will destroy the country's largest supply of fresh water. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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A Chinese Man, A $50 Billion Plan And A Canal To Reshape Nicaragua

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Nicaragua Seems To Escape Problems Suffered By Its Neighbors

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As Flow Of Migrants Into Mexico Grows, So Do Claims Of Abuse

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Haley Nordeen, 19, is spending the entire summer at the Prodesenh center in San Mateo Milpas Altas, Guatemala. The American University student helped build the center's new library. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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As 'Voluntourism' Explodes In Popularity, Who's It Helping Most?

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A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

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Ezequiel Vazquez and his 15-year-old son, Ilbaro, leave a government-run shelter in Guatemala City. Ilbaro was deported from the U.S. after spending six months in a Texas detention facility. He returned with a U.S.- issued duffel bag full of clothes, shoes, books and toys. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Deportation Threat Doesn't Diminish Young Migrants' U.S. Hopes

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Why Are Kids From Central America Risking Solo Travel To The U.S.?

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Mexico fans cheer during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Group A match between Brazil and Mexico on June 17. Miguel Tovar/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Mexico Fans Feel Unfairly Targeted For World Cup Chants

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Amalia Diaz, a 22-year-old from Honduras, holds her 5-month-old daughter, Shilin, as they wait in Tequixquiac, Mexico, for a northbound train to pass. They plan to jump onboard and ride on top of the train all the way to the United States border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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The Surge In Single Women With Children At The U.S.-Mexico Border

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For Mexico, Action On The Pitch Means Stillness In The Streets

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A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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A Flood Of Kids, On Their Own, Hope To Hop A Train To A New Life

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Bloodiest Region In Mexico? Right Across From McAllen, Texas

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