Carrie Kahn Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico.
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Carrie Kahn

Keith Dannemiller
Carrie Kahn headshot
Keith Dannemiller

Carrie Kahn

International Correspondent, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition, and on NPR.org.

Previously, she spent a decade based in Mexico City, Mexico, covering Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. She arrived in Mexico in the summer of 2012, on the eve of the election of President Enrique Peña Nieto and the PRI party's return to power, and reported on everything from the rise in violence throughout the country to its powerful drug cartels, and the arrest, escape and re-arrest of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. She reported on the Trump Administration's immigration policies and their effects on Mexico and Central America, the increasing international migration through the hemisphere, gang violence in Central America and the historic détente between the Obama Administration and Cuba.

Kahn has brought moving, personal stories to the forefront of NPR's coverage of the region. Some of her most notable coverage includes the stories of a Mexican man who was kidnapped and forced to dig a cross-border tunnel from Tijuana into San Diego, a Guatemalan family torn apart by President Trump's family separation policies and a Haitian family's situation immediately following the 2010 earthquake and on the ten-year anniversary of the disaster.

Prior to her post in Mexico, Kahn was a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and returned to the country on numerous occasions to continue NPR's coverage of the Caribbean nation. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, Texas.

She has covered hurricanes, the controversial life and death of pop icon Michael Jackson and firestorms and mudslides in Southern California,. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for NPR Member stations KQED and KPBS in California, with reporting focused on immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border.

Kahn is a recipient of the 2020 Cabot Prize from Columbia Journalism School, which honors distinguished reporting on Latin America and the Caribbean. In 2010 she was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. Kahn's work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a bachelor's degree in biology from UC Santa Cruz. For several years, she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on an English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

Story Archive

Fans watch from Copacabana Beach as Brazil plays its first World Cup game

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Fans arrive to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil round of 16 match between Brazil and Chile at Estadio Mineirão in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on June 28, 2014. Pedro Vilela/Getty Images hide caption

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Why some Brazilians won't be wearing their national soccer colors for the World Cup

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Supporters of Brazil's far-right president say he was the the subject of fraud

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Brazil's president-elect says the country is back in the preservation game

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Bolsonaro remains silent on election loss as power transitions in Brazil

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Brazil's president has finally broken his silence about the presidential election

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro speaks during a news conference at Alvorada Palace in Brasília, Brazil, on Tuesday. Bolsonaro vowed to follow the constitution in his first speech after narrowly losing Sunday's runoff election to Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, but didn't formally concede. Arthur Menescal/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Bolsonaro avoids conceding defeat, but begins transition to winner Lula

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Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva wins Brazil's election

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Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva wins Brazil's presidential election

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Brazilians go to polls to vote in a run-off election between Bolsonaro and Lula

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The latest on Brazil's contentious presidential run-off

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Indigenous women elected in Sao Paulo are hoping to improve representation

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The two candidates in Brazil's presidential elections campaign leading up to a runoff election. Left: President Jair Bolsonaro in Guarulhos on Saturday. Right: Former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva in Rio de Janeiro State on Oct. 11. Left: Caio Guatelli / AFP / Getty Images, Right: Carl de Souza / AFP / Getty Images hide caption

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Left: Caio Guatelli / AFP / Getty Images, Right: Carl de Souza / AFP / Getty Images