Carrie Kahn Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico.
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Carrie Kahn

Keith Dannemiller
Carrie Kahn headshot
Keith Dannemiller

Carrie Kahn

International Correspondent, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition, and on NPR.org.

Previously, she spent a decade based in Mexico City, Mexico, covering Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. She arrived in Mexico in the summer of 2012, on the eve of the election of President Enrique Peña Nieto and the PRI party's return to power, and reported on everything from the rise in violence throughout the country to its powerful drug cartels, and the arrest, escape and re-arrest of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. She reported on the Trump Administration's immigration policies and their effects on Mexico and Central America, the increasing international migration through the hemisphere, gang violence in Central America and the historic détente between the Obama Administration and Cuba.

Kahn has brought moving, personal stories to the forefront of NPR's coverage of the region. Some of her most notable coverage includes the stories of a Mexican man who was kidnapped and forced to dig a cross-border tunnel from Tijuana into San Diego, a Guatemalan family torn apart by President Trump's family separation policies and a Haitian family's situation immediately following the 2010 earthquake and on the ten-year anniversary of the disaster.

Prior to her post in Mexico, Kahn was a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and returned to the country on numerous occasions to continue NPR's coverage of the Caribbean nation. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, Texas.

She has covered hurricanes, the controversial life and death of pop icon Michael Jackson and firestorms and mudslides in Southern California,. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for NPR Member stations KQED and KPBS in California, with reporting focused on immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border.

Kahn is a recipient of the 2020 Cabot Prize from Columbia Journalism School, which honors distinguished reporting on Latin America and the Caribbean. In 2010 she was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. Kahn's work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a bachelor's degree in biology from UC Santa Cruz. For several years, she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on an English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

Story Archive

Sunday

As protests continue in Peru, no clear solution emerges

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Saturday

Deadly protests in Peru call for the resignation of President Dina Boluarte

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Thursday

Thousands of anti-government demonstrators have been flooding into Peru's capital

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Anti-government protesters who traveled to the capital from across the country march against Peruvian President Dina Boluarte in Lima on Wednesday. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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Martin Mejia/AP

Peru is on edge as protesters converge on the capital

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Sunday

Brazil's Supreme Court will investigate if Bolsonaro incited the attack on Congress

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Thursday

Protesters, supporters of Brazil's former President Jair Bolsonaro, stand on the roof of the National Congress building after they stormed it, in Brasília, Brazil, on Sunday. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Wednesday

2 Brazilian security officials are accused of colluding with rioters

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Tuesday

Brazil officials are looking into why rioters saw such little resistance from police

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Sunday's violence exposed the political and social fault lines in Brazil

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Monday

The devastation left in the wake of the riots at Brazil's government buildings

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Brazil's Supreme Court building is seen through a broken window of the Planalto presidential building in Brasília on Monday, a day after supporters of Brazil's far-right ex-president, Jair Bolsonaro, invaded the Congress, presidential palace and Supreme Court. Mauro Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mauro Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Bolsonaro lays low in Florida as Brazil cracks down on riots by his supporters

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Security forces in Brazil regain control after Bolsonaro supporters storm Congress

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Sunday

Pro-Bolsonaro protesters storm Brazil's Congress

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Sunday

President-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva waves from an open car after departing from the Metropolitan Cathedral to Congress for his swearing-in ceremony, in Brasília, Brazil, on Sunday. Gustavo Moreno/AP hide caption

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Gustavo Moreno/AP

Brazil plans 'Lulapalooza' as Luis Inácio Lula da Silva is sworn in as president

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