Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
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Martin Kaste

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Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

Story Archive

Tioga, Pennsylvania police controversy illustrates need for better background checks

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A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. A new report says the technology's security is vulnerable. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Cryptocurrency tech is vulnerable to tampering, a DARPA analysis finds

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Texas school cops get standardized active shooter training. It didn't work in Uvalde

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Texas funded police training for active shooters, but it failed in Uvalde

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Encore: Do red flag laws work?

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Biden signs police reform executive order on 2nd anniversary of George Floyd's death

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President Joe Biden arrives at the White House from his trip to Asia. His executive order will bring reforms to federal law enforcement. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A row of rifles for sale is on display at a gun shop in Aurora, Colo., on July 20, 2012. The mass shooting in Buffalo, N.Y., has prompted questions about the effectiveness of "red flag laws" passed in 19 states and the District of Columbia. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Should 18-year-olds be allowed to buy semi-automatic rifles? State and courts debate

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How old do you have to be to buy a gun? The answer varies in each state

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Non-U.S. citizens could become police officers in California, if this bill passes

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Officer Alexander Bires of SEPTA, the transit system for the Philadelphia region, speaks with a homeless man about outreach services at the 11th Street stop on the Market-Frankford Line in Philadelphia. Michelle Gustafson for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Gustafson for NPR

Transit riders are worried about safety. Police in Philly are trying a new approach

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Sgt. Joe Dydak and Lt. Dennis Rosenbaum examine bullet holes in a car. They're part of the Philadelphia Police Department's new citywide team investigating nonfatal shootings. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Philadelphia set a homicide record in 2021. Now police hope a new tactic deters crime

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Pills containing fentanyl are becoming increasingly common in drug trafficking

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A pill press machine seized by authorities is displayed during a news conference outside the Roybal Federal Building in February 2021 in Los Angeles. Patrick T. Fallon /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon /AFP via Getty Images