Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
Stories By

Martin Kaste

Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Offensive Social Media Posts By Police Lead To Internal Investigations In Several Cities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734883507/734883508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A southern resident orca whale swims in Puget Sound in view of Mount Rainier in 2014. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

Whale Watchers Accused Of Loving Endangered Orcas To Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733615945/733615946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A law enforcement official stands at an entrance to a municipal building that was the scene of a shooting last week in Virginia Beach, Va. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Do Extended Magazines Facilitate Mass Shootings?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729413913/729535435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Role Extended Magazines Are Playing In The Gun Control Debate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729390466/729390471" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Experts Talk Best Practices For Facial Recognition Technology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724433238/724433264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

San Francisco Is First U.S. City To Ban Facial Recognition Technology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/723466452/723466453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

State Rep. G.A. Hardaway traces the spiraling number of firearms stolen from cars back to legislation passed earlier in the decade. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Kaste/NPR

More Guns In Cars Mean More Guns Stolen From Cars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/717178960/721685252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Institute for Justice lawyer Wesley Hottot in his Seattle office. On the wall is a framed illustration of him arguing Timbs v. Indiana at the Supreme Court last fall. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Kaste/NPR

Defining What's Excessive In Police Property Seizures Remains Tricky

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710456736/711314509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Investigators Probe Software's Role In Deadly Boeing 737 Max Crashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705750240/705751629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Zealand Mosque Attacks Raise Questions About Internet's Role In Radicalization

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703912101/703912102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boeing Will Pause Delivery Of 737 Max Jets, But Continue To Build Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703535329/703535330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Reasonableness' Standard For Police Is Under Pressure After High-Profile Shootings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/702735028/702735029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript