Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.

Trump Tops Agenda At Merkel Press Conference

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NPR's Foreign Correspondents On Trump's Criticism Of Europe's Immigration Policy

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Some Germans Think President Trump Is Affecting Their Domestic Politics

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President Trump Criticizes Germany For Pipeline Deal With Russia

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LAPD Deputy Chief Dennis Kato tracks crime statistics in near real time and searches across databases using new, more powerful analytics tools. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

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In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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Okanogan County Chief Criminal Deputy Steve Brown surveys the debris left over from an illegal pot farm that had masqueraded as a legal operation. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Despite Legalization, Marijuana Black Market Hides In Plain Sight

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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Why The Waffle House Shooting Suspect Had Access To Guns After His Were Seized

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Hundreds of BLM protesters marched through the streets of Sacramento on March 30 demanding justice for Stephon Clark, who was shot and killed by Sacramento police on March 18. An independent autopsy commissioned by the Clark family revealed that Stephon Clark had been shot eight times with most of the shots hitting him in the back. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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After Stephon Clark Shooting, Questions Remain About Police Use Of Force

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Policing Since Ferguson: What's Changed?

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Sacramento Residents Concerned Over Video Showing Police Shooting Unarmed Man

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Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA's Institute for Legislative Action, speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference last year. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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