Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
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Martin Kaste

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Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

Story Archive

Friday

Gun control advocates worry about the impact of the Supreme Court's latest ruling

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BUMP STOCKS BAN

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Friday

Crimes against postal workers are up, but many never see their cases prosecuted

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Thursday

U.S. Airman Roger Fortson answers the door of his apartment on May 3, 2024, as captured by the body camera of the Okaloosa County sheriff's deputy responding to a report of a domestic disturbance. A split second later, the deputy fired at Fortson, killing him. Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office/Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office/Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office

Recent deaths bring up hard questions as police encounter more people with guns

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Thursday

Police arrest an alleged thief, not shown, on Roosevelt Avenue in Queens, New York. The neighborhood has seen a jump in robbery over the past year. Many residents blame migrants, but this suspect was American. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Migrant crime is politically charged, but the reality is more complicated

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Thursday

Examining the police response to the pro-Palestinian college protests

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Thursday

A father helps his son steady a firearm at the National Rifle Association (NRA) annual convention on May 28, 2022, in Houston, Texas. Exposing children to guns comes with risks, but some firearms enthusiasts say they'd prefer to train kids to use guns responsibly. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Amid concerns about kids and guns, some say training is the answer

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Thursday

Assistant principal is indicted in connection with shooting done by 6-year-old

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Friday

Riverside County Sheriff Chad Bianco says legalization has increased incentives for unlicensed cannabis farms and associated violent crime. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Black market cannabis thrives in California despite legalization

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Thursday

Chicago is suing firearms manufacturer Glock

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Friday

Some politicians who supported legalizing marijuana now want to curb 'potent pot'

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Tuesday

Tulalip Tribes Police arrest a suspect from another tribe on drug charges. One charge — possession of drug paraphernalia — wouldn't apply to non-Native suspects in Washington state Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Tribal courts can't prosecute non-Native drug suspects. Tribes say it's a problem

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Wednesday

Michigan court rules parents can share criminal responsibility for child's gun crimes

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Saturday

C.J. Hurst of West Covina, Calif., holds up a .44-caliber rimfire Model 66 Winchester rifle as he poses with his collection of about 600 antique guns in 1952. Don Brinn/AP hide caption

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In today's gun rights cases, historians are in hot demand. Here's why

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Wednesday

A boy uses a video screen to talk with his mother, who was held at the Campbell County Jail in Jacksboro, Tenn. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Jails are embracing video-only visits, but some experts say screens aren't enough

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Wednesday

Police in Bellevue, Wash., arrest a man accused of stealing a pair of white Nike shoes. The cops were on a stakeout outside the local mall, texting back and forth with store security to identify and apprehend suspected thieves. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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It's peak shopping — and shoplifting — season. Cops are stepping up antitheft tactics

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Tuesday

There's been a noticeable pushback against shoplifting this year

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Thursday

The latest on the manhunt for the Maine mass shooting suspect

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Wednesday

The road to the city-run gun range in Albuquerque, N.M. Police think the local culture around guns has changed, and one undercover cop estimates half the cars on the road now carry a firearm. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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The governor tried banning guns in Albuquerque. The public health emergency continues

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Tuesday

Federal court allows Albuquerque gun ban to stand while lawsuits proceed

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Sunday

California bans 'excited delirium' term as a cause of death

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Monday

Are more police officers facing prosecution? As the data shows, it's complicated.

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Wednesday

Matthew House, a day shelter for the homeless on Chicago's south side. This address was listed on 50 separate applications for emergency PPP small business loans. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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The perilous hunt for PPP fraud and the hot tip that wasn't

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Thursday

Chicago officials are joining the effort to crack down on cases of COVID aid fraud

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