Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
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Martin Kaste

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Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

Story Archive

Specialist Meric Greenbaum, left, works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Black Friday. Stocks dropped after a coronavirus variant appears to be spreading across the globe. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Darrell Brooks, left, speaks with a lawyer during his initial appearance, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021 in Waukesha County Court in Waukesha, Wis. Brooks is charged with intentional homicide after SUV was driven into a Christmas parade. Mark Hoffman/AP hide caption

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Mark Hoffman/AP

There's a backlash brewing against bail reform after the parade tragedy in Waukesha

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Wisconsin Christmas parade case raises questions around bail

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Climate Pledge Arena in Seattle asks fans to prove their vaccination status with the CLEAR Health Pass app Martin Kaste/Martin Kaste hide caption

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Martin Kaste/Martin Kaste

There's an app to help prove vax status, but experts say choose wisely

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Competing lawn signs are placed outside a polling place Tuesday in Minneapolis. Voters decided not to replace the city's police department with a new Department of Public Safety. The election comes more than a year after George Floyd's death launched a movement to defund or abolish police across the country. Christian Monterrosa/AP hide caption

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Christian Monterrosa/AP

Minneapolis voters reject a measure to replace the city's police department

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A detainee worker moves a cart of trays containing chicken fajita meals during a 2019 media tour of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Tacoma, Wash. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Minneapolis will soon put the future of their police department to a vote

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After the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., news organizations started to keep their own tallies of deaths, which turned out to be higher than the government's numbers. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Examining Where Police Reform Efforts Stand In Chicago, New York And Seattle

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The Pandemic Puts Criminal Courts Behind Schedule As Violent Crime Spikes

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The Man Convicted Of Killing Sen. Robert Kennedy Has Been Granted Parole

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Sirhan Sirhan, who was convicted of the 1968 assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, had his 16th parole hearing Friday. Members of the California Board of Parole recommended that Sirhan be paroled. Donaldson Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Donaldson Collection/Getty Images

Agencies Scramble To Resettle Afghan Refugees In The Seattle Area

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Americans Who Trained Afghan Pilots Now Fear For Pilots' Safety

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The Minneapolis Police Department has been under increased scrutiny by residents and elected officials after the murder of George Floyd in police custody last year. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images