Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
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Martin Kaste

Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

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Trump supporters attend an October rally hosted by Long Island and New York City police unions in support of the police in Suffolk County, N.Y. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

How Much Support Did The Attack On The U.S. Capitol Have From Police?

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The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin (left), is overseeing the massive criminal investigation of Wednesday's assault on the U.S. Capitol. Tasos Katopodis/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

D.C.'s Acting U.S. Attorney Calls Scope Of Capitol Investigation 'Unprecedented'

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Why Police Departments Are Reluctant To Enforce Public Health Orders

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Police Departments Try To Walk The Line Between Reform, Public Safety

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A crowd gathers for a rally to demand justice in the death of Breonna Taylor on the steps of the the Kentucky State Capitol in June. Taylor was killed in her apartment while Louisville police served a warrant. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Activists Say A Simple Ban On 'No-Knock' Raids May Not Be Enough

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Was Anything Accomplished By Racial Justice Protests In The Pacific-Northwest?

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What A Biden Administration May Do To Change Policing

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Uniformed police are generally not allowed around polling places, and the Pentagon doesn't want to get involved. Still, they're getting ready if things get out of control. Vladimir Vladimirov/Getty Images hide caption

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Vladimir Vladimirov/Getty Images

How Police, National Guard And Military Are Preparing For Election Day Tensions

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Will Law And Order Need To Be Enforced During Election Day Polling?

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How Endorsement Of Trump Could Affect Legitimacy Of Police

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Secret Service Agents Worry About Risk Of Contracting The Coronavirus

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