Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy, as well as news from the Pacific Northwest.

In addition to general assignment reporting in the U.S., Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota.

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Story Archive

Thousands of Berliners come to Tempelhof on warm summer evenings, but there's always room for more. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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The Site Of The Berlin Airlift Now Serves As Refugee Shelter And Big Open Park

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For Local Cops In Germany, No Talk Of 'Sanctuary Cities'

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German Soccer Player Says He Quit National Team Because Of Racism

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Trump Tops Agenda At Merkel Press Conference

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NPR's Foreign Correspondents On Trump's Criticism Of Europe's Immigration Policy

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Some Germans Think President Trump Is Affecting Their Domestic Politics

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President Trump Criticizes Germany For Pipeline Deal With Russia

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LAPD Deputy Chief Dennis Kato tracks crime statistics in near real time and searches across databases using new, more powerful analytics tools. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

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In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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Okanogan County Chief Criminal Deputy Steve Brown surveys the debris left over from an illegal pot farm that had masqueraded as a legal operation. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Despite Legalization, Marijuana Black Market Hides In Plain Sight

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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Why The Waffle House Shooting Suspect Had Access To Guns After His Were Seized

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Hundreds of BLM protesters marched through the streets of Sacramento on March 30 demanding justice for Stephon Clark, who was shot and killed by Sacramento police on March 18. An independent autopsy commissioned by the Clark family revealed that Stephon Clark had been shot eight times with most of the shots hitting him in the back. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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After Stephon Clark Shooting, Questions Remain About Police Use Of Force

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