Martin Kaste Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk.
Martin Kaste 2010
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Martin Kaste

Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy. He has been focused on police and use of force since before the 2014 protests in Ferguson, and that coverage led to the creation of NPR's Criminal Justice Collaborative.

In addition to criminal justice reporting, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

Story Archive

The Pandemic Puts Criminal Courts Behind Schedule As Violent Crime Spikes

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The Man Convicted Of Killing Sen. Robert Kennedy Has Been Granted Parole

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Sirhan Sirhan, who was convicted of the 1968 assassination of Robert F. Kennedy, had his 16th parole hearing Friday. Members of the California Board of Parole recommended that Sirhan be paroled. Donaldson Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Donaldson Collection/Getty Images

Agencies Scramble To Resettle Afghan Refugees In The Seattle Area

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Americans Who Trained Afghan Pilots Now Fear For Pilots' Safety

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The Minneapolis Police Department has been under increased scrutiny by residents and elected officials after the murder of George Floyd in police custody last year. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Minneapolis Police's Staff Shortage Could Pave The Way For The Future Of Policing

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An Increase In Violent Crimes Is Complicating A Push To Defund The Minneapolis Police

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Police Consent Decrees Are Coming Back — But They Might Not Make Sense Anymore

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Remembering F. Lee Bailey, Famed Trial Lawyer

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Cities Are Weighing The Dangers And Benefits Of Facial Recognition

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Violent Crime Has Stayed High — Whether Police Are The Answer Is Up For Debate

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Critics say American officers should be trained in defensive tactics, especially empty-hand techniques, so that they depend less on tasers and guns. Images by Steve Skinner Photogra/Getty Images hide caption

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Images by Steve Skinner Photogra/Getty Images

American Cops Are Under Pressure To Rely Less On Guns And Take More Personal Risk

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Police Training Varies Across The U.S. Is It Time For National Standards?

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Police Officers Monitored Derek Chauvin's Trial Very Closely

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