Peter Kenyon Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.
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Peter Kenyon

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Peter Kenyon - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Peter Kenyon

International Correspondent, Istanbul, Turkey

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

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Story Archive

Fighting Breaks Out In Disputed Territory Of Nagorno-Karabakh

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U.S. Sanctions, COVID-19 Deal Double Blow To Iran's Economy

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Turkey Considers Quitting Treaty On Violence Against Women

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How Turkey Ended Up Depending On Imported Food

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Turkey Holds 1st Muslim Prayers In Hagia Sophia Newly Converted Into A Mosque

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Istanbul's Byzantine-era landmark has been used as a museum since 1934 and is widely regarded as a symbol of peaceful religious coexistence. A court ruling Friday revoked its museum status. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey Converts Istanbul's Iconic Hagia Sophia Back Into A Mosque

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Turkey's Claims For Drilling Rights In Mediterranean Sea Lead To Threats From Greece

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Turkish President May Call Elections 2 Years Before The End Of His Term

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Turkish President Keeps Pushing Forward With The Waterway Project

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Turkey Faces Currency Crisis As COVID-19 Strains Economy

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Iranians shop at the Grand Bazaar in Tehran on Monday. This week officials allowed major shopping areas to reopen, prompting a warning from Tehran's coronavirus task force. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

An aerial picture shows the Galata Bridge and the Bosporus in Istanbul on Saturday, as the Turkish government imposed a two-day curfew to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Iranians Adjust To Life During COVID-19 Outbreak

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A display of Turkey's popular Rebul colognes in Istanbul. Cologne is in high demand because its 80% alcohol content helps it double as a disinfectant in the Turkish tradition of splashing hands when arriving at or leaving someone's home, a restaurant or elsewhere. Gokce Saracoglu for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu for NPR