David Kestenbaum David Kestenbaum is a science correspondent for NPR. His job allows him to combine his extensive background in physics with his love of broadcast journalism.
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David Kestenbaum

For Greece, Breaking The 'Orbital Pull Of Stupid'

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How Do You Rate A Country?

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A merchant in Delhi offers a ledger book used to track pay for government employees. David Kestenbaum/NPR hide caption

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In Search Of India's Red-Tape Factory

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The collapse of the housing market has turned more than $1 trillion in mortgage-backed bonds into toxic assets. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A computer monitor confirms the purchase of a toxic asset. (Note: Some information is intentionally blurred out.) David Kestenbaum/NPR hide caption

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