David Kestenbaum David Kestenbaum is a science correspondent for NPR. His job allows him to combine his extensive background in physics with his love of broadcast journalism.
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David Kestenbaum

Thomas Peterffy, shown here in 2010 Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

A Father Of High-Speed Trading Thinks We Should Slow Down

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London-based Barclays Bank agreed to pay a $453 million fine over charges it manipulated the London Interbank Offered Rate — LIBOR — a key global interest rate. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Losing With LIBOR: One Trader's Story

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The U.S. Supreme Court, 70 years after rejecting Roscoe Filburn's bid to limit the federal government's power to regulate commerce. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Farmer And The Commerce Clause

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"I'm 101 at the moment," Ronald Coase said. University of Chicago hide caption

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University of Chicago

Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All'

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Enough already with the krona? Jesse Garrison/Flickr hide caption

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Jesse Garrison/Flickr

When Should A Country Abandon Its Own Money?

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U.S. Treasury Department/Walt Disney

From Abe Lincoln To Donald Duck: History Of The Income Tax

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There is an advantage to strengthening the currency for people in China: It makes their imports cheaper. A clerk counts bank notes in a bank in Nantong, east China's Jiangsu Province. Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xinhua /Landov

China's Giant Pool Of Dollars

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How many government-owned businesses do you see in this picture? Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

From Cellphones To Cigarettes: The Long Arm Of The Chinese Government

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This can't go on forever. Jacob Goldstein/NPR hide caption

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Jacob Goldstein/NPR

Is China An Economic Miracle, Or A Bubble Waiting To Pop?

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Yen Jingchang was one of the signers of the secret document. Jacob Goldstein/NPR hide caption

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Jacob Goldstein/NPR

The Secret Document That Transformed China

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Demand for quarter, dimes, nickels, and pennies was up this year. AP hide caption

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AP

People Want More Coins, That's A Good Sign For The Economy

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Dollar coins gathering dust in the Fed's Baltimore brach. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

White House Kills Dollar Coin Program

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