Allison Keyes Allison Keyes is an award-winning journalist with 20 years of experience in print, radio, and television. Along with reporting for NPR's News & Notes with Ed Gordon from her base in New York, she has served as a substitute host for the program.
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Allison Keyes

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Chuck Berry in 1958, posing with his Gibson hollow-body electric guitar. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Chuck Berry, Legend Of Rock 'N' Roll, Dies At 90

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Washington, D.C., Councilman and former Mayor Marion Barry was famously re-elected after going to jail for crack cocaine possession, but started out as a champion for the city's disenfranchised. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry Dies

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George Clinton emerges from Parliament-Funkadelic's Mothership on June 4, 1977, at the Coliseum in Los Angeles. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Well, All Right, Starchild, The Mothership Is Back

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Rufus Reid has played with just about everybody in the mainstream jazz world. His latest project, Quiet Pride, is based on works by the late sculptor and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett. Jimmy Katz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jimmy Katz/Courtesy of the artist

How Do You Wring Sound From Sculpture? It Takes A 'Quiet Pride'

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150 Years On, Arlington National Cemetery Honors Its First Burial

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Students from Bridge Street Middle School in Wheeling, W.Va., walk at the Washington Monument, ahead of a ceremony Monday to celebrate its reopening nearly three years after it was closed following damage sustained during an earthquake in August 2011. AP hide caption

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AP

Nearly 3 Years After Quake, Washington Monument Reopens

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Under Fire, Maryland Dealer Drops Plans To Sell Smart Gun

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A cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull greets visitors as they enter the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

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Competition Watches As Wal-Mart Debuts Money Transfer Service

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Potential Charges Against Incumbent Throw D.C. Mayor's Race Up In Air

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Maryland Transportation Bill Held Up Over War Reparations

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After the Rockefeller Center mural was destroyed in 1934, Diego Rivera recreated this version, named Man, Controller of the Universe, which is on display at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The story of the original mural's creation and destruction is the focus of a Mexican Cultural Institute exhibition in Washington, D.C. Courtesy of Museo Frida Kahlo hide caption

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Courtesy of Museo Frida Kahlo

Destroyed By Rockefellers, Mural Trespassed On Political Vision

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As Calendar Flips To March, People Grow Sick Of The Snow

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At Twenty Years Old, Landmark Gun Law Weathers New World

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