Richard Knox Since he joined NPR in 2000, Knox has covered a broad range of issues and events in public health, medicine, and science. His reports can be heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Talk of the Nation, and newscasts.

Story Archive

Health workers collect the body of a cholera victim in Petionville, Haiti, in February 2011. The disease first appeared on the island in October 2010, likely introduced by U.N. peacekeepers from Nepal, possibly a single individual. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Participants in a boxing class designed specifically for people with Parkinson's disease at Fight 2 Fitness gym in Pawtucket, R.I. Joel Hawksley for NPR hide caption

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Joel Hawksley for NPR

Fight Parkinson's: Exercise May Be The Best Therapy

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After the earthquake in 2010, about 1,000 people were living in tents on the median of Highway 2, one of Haiti's busiest roads. Five years later, tens of thousands of people in Port-au-Prince still live in tents and other temporary housing. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Advocates demonstrate in favor of cheaper generic drugs to treat hepatitis C in New Delhi on March 21. The disease is common among people who are HIV positive. Saurabh Das/AP hide caption

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Saurabh Das/AP

If new guidelines are followed fully, half the medicine chests in America could eventually be stocked with cholesterol-lowering drugs such as atorvastatin, the generic form of Lipitor. Bill Gallery/AP hide caption

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Bill Gallery/AP

C. Nash smokes after possession of marijuana became legal in Washington state on Dec. 6, 2012. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Evidence On Marijuana's Health Effects Is Hazy At Best

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Jockeys take their camels home after racing in Egypt's El Arish desert. The annual race draws competitors from around the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, where camels carry the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus. Nasser Nouri/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Nasser Nouri/Xinhua /Landov

New research finds a close connection between the flu that devastated the horse population in North America in the 1870s and the avian flu of that period. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Barbara Mancini with her father, Joseph Yourshaw. Barbara Mancini via Compassion & Choices hide caption

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Barbara Mancini via Compassion & Choices

A girl with hepatitis C holds a medical report while being treated at a hospital in Hefei, China, in 2011. China has one of the greatest burdens of hepatitis C, but it's still not clear whether a deal for lower prices for a new drug from Gilead Sciences will apply there. Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Landov

Some men take testosterone hoping to boost energy and libido, or to build strength. But at what risk? iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A vendor sells chickens at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last month. As a precautionary measure against the deadly H7N9 virus, Hong Kong has temporarily stopped importing poultry from mainland farms. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images

Amanda Gerety, a staff nurse at Boston Medical Center, checks monitors that track patients' vital signs. Fewer beeps means crisis warnings are easier to hear, she says. Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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Richard Knox/NPR

Silencing Many Hospital Alarms Leads To Better Health Care

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John Hartigan, proprietor of Vapeology LA, a store selling electronic cigarettes and related items, takes a puff from an electronic cigarette in Los Angeles. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Surgeon General Adds New Risks To Long List Of Smoking's Harms

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