Jennifer Ludden NPR National Correspondent Jennifer Ludden covers economic inequality, exploring systemic disparities in housing, food insecurity and wealth.
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Jennifer Ludden

Jennifer Ludden is a National Correspondent.
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Jennifer Ludden at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Jennifer Ludden

Correspondent, National Desk

NPR National Correspondent Jennifer Ludden covers economic inequality, exploring systemic disparities in housing, food insecurity and wealth. She seeks to explain the growing gap between socio-economic groups, and government policies to try and change it.

Previously, Ludden edited stories on climate and energy, working with NPR staffers and a team of public radio reporters across the country. She helped track the shift to clean energy, climate policies and pushback to them, and how people and communities are coping with the mounting impacts of the warming world.

Before that, Ludden was an NPR correspondent covering family life and social issues, including the changing economics of marriage, the changing role of dads, and the ethical challenges of reproductive technology. She's also covered immigration and national security.

Ludden started reporting with NPR while based overseas in West Africa, Europe and the Middle East. She shared in two awards (Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists) for NPR's coverage of the Kosovo war in 1999, and won the Robert F. Kennedy Award for her coverage of the overthrow of Mobutu Sese Seko in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When not navigating war zones, Ludden reported on cultural trends, including the dying tradition of storytellers in Syria, the emergence of Persian pop music in Iran, and the rise of a new form of urban polygamy in Africa.

Ludden has also reported from Canada and at public radio stations in Boston and Maine. She's a graduate of Syracuse University with degrees in television, radio, and film production and in English.

Story Archive

Brandon Schwedes of Port Orange, Fla., with his 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son. Schwedes had to move this year when the landlord dramatically raised the rent, then was outbid before finding another place he could afford. Brandon Schwedes hide caption

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Brandon Schwedes

March For Our Lives rallies across U.S. push for gun control

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March For Our Lives rallies across the U.S. call for gun control

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Abortion rights activists say there's still work to do after Supreme Court leak

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A woman loads her car at a food pantry in Norfolk, Virginia. Inflation sent food prices soaring just as emergency pandemic support for many people ended. Eze Amos for NPR hide caption

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Eze Amos for NPR

Demand at food banks is way up again. But inflation makes it harder to meet the need

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Abortion-rights advocates demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court last December as it heard a case that could strike down the constitutional right to abortion. Economists say decades of research show that doing so would limit women's economic prospects. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Women who are denied abortions risk falling deeper into poverty. So do their kids

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Abortion opponents are excited about the Roe v. Wade leak, but say there's work to do

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Eviction filings are rising even as rents spike and inflation cuts deeper into household budgets. tommy/Getty Images hide caption

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Eviction filings are up sharply as pandemic rental aid starts to run out

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Marisela Orozco (foreground) is letting her sister, Marissa, live in the house she thought she would own after making almost four years of payments. But the owner disappeared, along with the title, and she worries he may return and evict them. Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3 hide caption

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Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Millions of Americans are resorting to risky ways to buy an affordable home

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Short staffed from omicron, airlines canceled some Christmas Eve flights last minute

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A Lufthansa flight arrives at Miami International Airport last month. The German airline, along with United and Delta, reported canceling dozens of Christmas Eve departures as illnesses tied to the omicron variant of COVID-19 take a toll on flight crew. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Some Christmas travelers face canceled flights as the omicron surge hits airlines

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Wind turbines silhouetted against the sky at dawn near Spearville, Kan. in January. Senator Joe Manchin's rejection of a sweeping spending bill effectively kills President Biden's ambitious climate plan to transform the nation's heavily fossil-fuel powered economy into a clean-burning one. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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A pedestrian using an umbrella to get some relief from the sun walks past a sign displaying the temperature on June 20, 2017, in Phoenix. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Your Weather Forecast Update: Warmer Climate Will Be The New 'Normal'

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