Jennifer Ludden Jennifer Ludden helps edit energy and environment stories for NPR's National Desk.
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Jennifer Ludden

Jennifer Ludden is a National Correspondent.
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Jennifer Ludden at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Jennifer Ludden

Energy and Environment Editor

Jennifer Ludden helps edit energy and environment stories for NPR's National Desk, working with NPR staffers and a team of public radio reporters across the country. They track the shift to clean energy, state and federal policy moves, and how people and communities are coping with the mounting impacts of climate change.

Previously, Ludden was an NPR correspondent covering family life and social issues, including the changing economics of marriage, the changing role of dads, and the ethical challenges of reproductive technology. She's also covered immigration and national security.

Ludden started reporting with NPR while based overseas in West Africa, Europe and the Middle East. She shared in two awards (Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists) for NPR's coverage of the Kosovo war in 1999, and won the Robert F. Kennedy Award for her coverage of the overthrow of Mobutu Sese Seko in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When not navigating war zones, Ludden reported on cultural trends, including the dying tradition of storytellers in Syria, the emergence of Persian pop music in Iran, and the rise of a new form of urban polygamy in Africa.

Ludden has also reported from Canada and at public radio stations in Boston and Maine. She's a graduate of Syracuse University with degrees in television, radio, and film production and in English.

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Story Archive

Hundreds of schoolchildren take part in a climate protest in Hong Kong Friday. So-called 'school strikes' were planned in more than 100 countries and territories, including the U.S., to protest governments' failure to act against global warming. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Skipping School Around The World To Push For Action On Climate Change

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The Trump administration EPA says regulations to reduce power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants are too costly and should no longer be considered legally "appropriate and necessary." Matt Brown/AP hide caption

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Matt Brown/AP

Volunteers search a mobile home park in Paradise, Calif. Government scientists predict wildfires like the one that struck this community will contribute to billions in losses for the U.S. economy. Kathleen Ronayne/AP hide caption

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Kathleen Ronayne/AP

A gas flare at a natural gas processing facility near Williston, N.D. The Trump administration wants to ease regulations on methane emissions from energy production on public lands. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

At the school that NPR's Jennifer Ludden's kids attend, they're phasing in a new policy to lock up mobile phones during the day. picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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picture alliance via Getty Images

Opinion: Please Take Away My Kids' Cellphones At School

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Bob Fitzgerald stands in a spot where frequent floods have killed 15 acres of soybean crops. Behind him is a row of phragmites, an invasive plant common in wetlands. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Flooding And Rising Seas Threaten America's Oldest Farmland

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EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Prepares For Questions On Ethics Allegations

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How Much Can The Repeal Of The Clean Power Plan Help The Declining Coal Industry?

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Environmental Protection Agency To Eliminate Obama's Clean Power Plan

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Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

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Rick Moore, a dairy farmer in Canton, N.Y., has a solar thermal array to heat water he uses to spray down milking equipment. David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio

As Obama Clean Power Plan Fades, States Craft Strategies To Move Beyond It

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