Julie McCarthy Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as a international correspondent for NPR.
Julie McCarthy
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Julie McCarthy

Julie McCarthy
Wen Wang/N/A

Julie McCarthy

International Correspondent, South East Asia

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's South East Asia correspondent. Previously she served as NPR's international correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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Story Archive

In Indonesia, Joko Widodo Secures Another 5-Year Term As President

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Heading Into Indonesia's Election, Islamic Fundamentalism Gains Traction

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Indonesia's Presidential Race Shows Islamic Fundamentalism Is Gaining Traction

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Filipino Catholic priests (seated from left) Albert Alejo, Robert Reyes and Flavie Villanueva are prayed over by nuns and religious leaders after talking to reporters in Quezon City, north of Manila, Philippines, on March 11. The three priests say they and other clergy who have criticized the president's crackdown on drugs, have received death threats from unknown people. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Philippine Clergy Reports Death Threats As President Duterte Rails Against Church

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Drug War Spotlighted In Lead-Up To Philippine Midterms

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A Crackdown On Journalism In The Philippines

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Filipinos pose for souvenir shots at the "Christmas House" owned by businessman Alexander Cruz in suburban Cainta, Rizal province, Philippines, on Dec. 12, 2017. The whole house, decorated with hundreds of thousands of LED lights, has attracted local and foreign tourists. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Love The Holidays? The Philippines Celebrates 4 Months Of Christmas Mania

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Want The Christmas Season To Last Longer? Go To The Philippines

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Residents take photos and try to touch one of the three Balangiga church bells after a ceremony returning them to the church in the town of Balangiga in the Philippines on Dec. 15, 2018. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippines Duterte Praises 'Generous' Americans For Returning Church Bells

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American troops seized three Philippine church bells as war trophies over a century ago. Now the bells of Balangiga have returned. Ella Mage/NPR hide caption

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U.S. Returns Balangiga Church Bells To The Philippines After More Than A Century

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U.S. And Philippines To End 117-Year-Old Feud As Church Bells Return

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) shakes hands with Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte after a guest book signing at the Malacañang presidential palace in Manila on Tuesday. Duterte called Xi's visit to longtime U.S. ally the Philippines a "milestone." Mark R. Cristino/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China's President To Meet With His Philippine Counterpart

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In Indonesia, Airliner Crashes With 189 Aboard

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Super Typhoon Hits The Northern Mariana Islands

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