Renee Montagne Renee Montagne is a special correspondent and host at NPR.
Renee Montagne at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Renee Montagne

Allison Shelley/NPR
Renee Montagne at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Renee Montagne

Special Correspondent and Host

Renee Montagne, one of the best-known names in public radio, is a special correspondent and host for NPR News.

Montagne's most recent assignment was a yearlong collaboration with ProPublica reporter Nina Martin, investigating the alarming rate of maternal mortality in the U.S., as compared to other developed countries. The series, called "Lost Mothers," was recognized with more than a dozen awards in American journalism, including a Peabody Award, a George Polk Award, and Harvard's Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Journalism. The series was also named a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize.

From 2004 to 2016, Montagne co-hosted NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. Her first experience as host of an NPR newsmagazine came in 1987, when she, along with Robert Siegel, were named the new hosts of All Things Considered.

After leaving All Things Considered, Montagne traveled to South Africa in early 1990, arriving to report from there on the day Nelson Mandela emerged from 27 years in prison. In 1994, she and a small team of NPR reporters were awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for their coverage of South Africa's historic elections that led to Mandela becoming that country's first black president.

Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Montagne has made 10 extended reporting trips to Afghanistan. She has traveled to every major city, from Kabul to Kandahar, to peaceful villages, and to places where conflict raged. She has profiled Afghanistan's presidents and power brokers, but focused on the stories of Afghans at the heart of that complex country: school girls, farmers, mullahs, poll workers, midwives, and warlords. Her coverage has been honored by the Overseas Press Club, and, for stories on Afghan women in particular, by the Gracie Awards.

One of her most cherished honors dates to her days as a freelance reporter in the 1980s, when Montagne and her collaborator, the writer Thulani Davis, were awarded "First Place in Radio" by the National Association of Black Journalists for their series "Fanfare for the Warriors." It told the story of African-American musicians in the military bands from WW1 to Vietnam.

Montagne began her career in radio pretty much by accident, when she joined a band of friends, mostly poets and musicians, who were creating their own shows at a new, scrappy little San Francisco community station called KPOO. Her show was called Women's Voices.

Montagne graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California, Berkeley. Her career includes teaching broadcast writing at New York University's Graduate Department of Journalism (now the Carter Institute).

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Little, Brown

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Chris Phelps/Courtesy of the artist

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Using a mannequin to simulate dangerous scenarios, a team at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center learns standard treatments for obstetric emergencies like hemorrhage. Bethany Mollenkof for NPR hide caption

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To Keep Women From Dying In Childbirth, Look To California

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Art's 'Sense Of Humor' Chronicled At The National Gallery Of Art

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Alicia Nichols holds her daughter Diana in her home in February. After the birth of Diana, Nichols suffered unusual postpartum blood loss that she feels was not taken seriously by her doctor. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

For Every Woman Who Dies In Childbirth In The U.S., 70 More Come Close

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There are roughly 300 million guns in America today. Gun owners have been thinking deeply about the role of firearms in American life. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Gun Owners Grapple With Shifting Conversations Around Firearms

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The Breeders' All Nerve — the band's fifth album, and first in 10 years — is out now. Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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The Breeders Are 'All Nerve' After A Long Hiatus

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'No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria' By Rania Abouzeid. W. W. Norton & Company hide caption

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In 'No Turning Back,' The 'Epic' Journeys Of Four Syrians In Wartime

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Partition, Through A Child's Eyes, In 'The Night Diary'

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Many Women Come Close To Death In Childbirth

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Andrew Lloyd Webber's new memoir, Unmasked, covers the composer's life and creative process. Gregg Delman /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Andrew Lloyd Webber's Genius Is 'Unmasked' In New Memoir

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