Renee Montagne Renee Montagne is a special correspondent at NPR.
Doby Photography/NPR
Renee Montagne 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Renee Montagne

Special Correspondent

Renee Montagne is a special correspondent at NPR.

Montagne co-hosted NPR's Morning Edition—the most widely heard radio news program in the United States—from 2004-2016, broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene at NPR's Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Montagne is a familiar voice on NPR, having reported and hosted since the mid-1980s. She hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years in the late 1980s, and previously worked for NPR's Science, National and Foreign desks.

Montagne traveled to Greenwich, England, in May 2007 to kick off the yearlong series, "Climate Connections," in which NPR partnered with National Geographic to chronicle how people are changing the Earth's climate and how the climate is impacting people. From the prime meridian, she laid out the journey that would take listeners to Africa, New Orleans and the Antarctic.

Since 9/11, Montagne has gone to Afghanistan ten times, traveling throughout the country to speak to Afghans about their lives. She's interviewed farmers and mullahs, poll workers and President Karzai, infamous warlords turned politicians and women fighting for their rights. She has produced several series, beginning in 2002 with 'Recreating Afghanistan," through 2013, asking a new generation of Afghans — born into the long war set off by the Soviet invasion — how they see their country's future. Her last trip was to cover the 2014 presidential election.

In the spring of 2005, Montagne took Morning Edition to Rome for the funeral of Pope John Paul ll. She co-anchored from Vatican City during a historic week when millions of pilgrims and virtually every world leader descended on the Vatican.

In 1990, Montagne traveled to South Africa to cover Nelson Mandela's release from prison, and continued to report from South Africa for three years. In 1994, she and a team of NPR reporters won a prestigious Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of South Africa's historic presidential and parliamentary elections.

Through most of the 1980s, Montagne was based in New York, working as an independent producer and reporter for both NPR and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Prior to that, she worked as a reporter/editor for Pacific News Service in San Francisco. She began her career as news director of the city's community radio station, KPOO, while still at university.

In addition to the duPont Columbia Award, Montagne has been honored by the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of Afghanistan, and by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on Black musicians going to war in the 20th century.

Montagne graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, as a Phi Beta Kappa. Her career includes serving as a fellow at the University of Southern California with the National Arts Journalism Program, and teaching broadcast writing at New York University's Graduate Department of Journalism.

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Story Archive

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Black Mothers Keep Dying After Giving Birth. Shalon Irving's Story Explains Why

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Todd Haynes On 'Wonderstruck,' And Evolution Of Deaf Culture In The U.S.

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In Puerto Rico's Interior, Hurricane Maria Cut A Community Off From The World

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When You Want To Give, Here's How To Vet Your Options

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Author Says Gossip Helps Protect Women From Workplace Predators

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In this image from video released by Taliban Media in December 2016, Caitlan Coleman talks in the video while her Canadian husband Joshua Boyle holds their two children. U.S. officials said Pakistan secured the release of Coleman of Stewartstown, Pa., and her husband, who were abducted five years ago while traveling in Afghanistan and then were held by the Haqqani network. Taliban Media via AP hide caption

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Taliban Media via AP

Canadian Man Details Horrors Family Endured In Years Held By Haqqani Network

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More Destructive, Expensive, Dangerous: What's Ramping Up Wildfires?

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In A Busy Week, Trump Tests The 'You Break It, You Own It' Rule

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As Trump Alters Affordable Care Act, Programs To Aid, Enroll Users Are Cut

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On Iran, Health Care And Environment, Trump Turns To Executive Actions

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Mortician Caitlin Doughty has traveled around the world exploring the ways other cultures approach death. Mara Zehler hide caption

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Mara Zehler

Mortician Explores Cultures' Many Paths For 'Sacred Transition' Of Death

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The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. is the highest among affluent nations. Researchers believe that with better education, postpartum nurses could help mothers identify life-threatening complications. Mart Klein/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Nurses Lack Knowledge Of Health Risks To Mothers After Childbirth

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Marie McCausland holds her newborn shortly after delivery. A ProPublica/NPR story about preeclampsia prompted her to seek emergency treatment when she developed symptoms days after giving birth. Courtesy of Marie McCausland hide caption

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Courtesy of Marie McCausland

U.S. Hospitals Struggle To Protect Mothers When Childbirth Turns Deadly

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