Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

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Omarosa Manigault Newman was cast as a villain in The Apprentice by Donald Trump, who then brought her to the White House. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality Despite Millions Of Fake Public Comments

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Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni Bryson (left) arrive at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Franken announced on the Senate floor that he would be resigning "in the coming weeks." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of the far-right organization Britain First, tweeted: "GOD BLESS YOU TRUMP! GOD BLESS AMERICA!" after the president retweeted a video from the controversial group. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump speaks to reporters next to the empty chairs for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.. The Democrats declined to attend a meeting with Trump and Republican leaders at the White House on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Administration Has More Than 250 Unfilled Jobs

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Then-candidate Donald Trump walks onstage at a presidential debate in St. Louis two days after a video was released, in which he is heard talking to Access Hollywood host Billy Bush about sexually assaulting women. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., leave a meeting with House Republicans on Thursday, shortly before the House approved a GOP tax overhaul plan. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appears in 2009 with then-Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama. McConnell suggested on Tuesday that Sessions run as a write-in candidate to keep former judge Roy Moore from winning his old seat. Ron Edmonds/AP hide caption

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