Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Gordon Sondland, the United States ambassador to the European Union, addresses the media during a press conference at the U.S. Embassy to Romania in Bucharest in September. Sondland is speaking to House investigators on Thursday. Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images

What Role Are Inspectors General Supposed To Play In America's Democracy?

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Associates of President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani have been arrested on campaign finance charges. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

2 Giuliani Associates Arrested On Campaign Finance Violations

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The White House this week released a declassified phone transcript of a conversation between President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy from July 25. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

A person opens the door of a Department of Licensing office in Lacey, Wash. Starting Oct. 1, 2020, travelers will need a REAL ID-compliant driver's license or other accepted form of ID to pass through airport security. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Planning To Fly A Year From Now? Better Double-Check Your Driver's License

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House intelligence committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., arrives for a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. His committee has released a whistleblower complaint raising concern about President Trump. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Whistleblowers have been reporting wrongdoing in government institutions since the late 1770s. But it has always been risky. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

'Whistleblowing Is Really In Our DNA': A History Of Reporting Wrongdoing

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