Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas listens during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 26, 2020. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gymnasts (from left) Aly Raisman, Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Maggie Nichols leave after testifying Wednesday at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation. Nassar was charged in 2016 with federal child pornography offenses and sexual abuse charges in Michigan and is now serving decades in prison. Saul Loeb/Pool via AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool via AP

Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett speaks Sunday at the University of Louisville's McConnell Center in Kentucky. She told an audience that "judicial philosophies are not the same as political parties." Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

In the years after the 9/11 terror attacks, security became omnipresent in Washington, D.C. That includes bollards, Jersey barriers and security barricades like those seen here outside of the U.S. Capitol. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

After 9/11 Security Became Omnipresent In Washington, But Threats Are Different Now

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President Biden tours Brookland Middle School in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Biden has encouraged school districts to promote vaccines to protect students as they return to school amid a coronavirus resurgence. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

How Security Measures In Washington, D.C., Have Changed Since 9/11

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A pickup is parked Thursday on the sidewalk in front of the Library of Congress' Thomas Jefferson Building, as seen from a window of the U.S. Capitol. A man sitting in the truck told police he had a bomb. He later surrendered. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Federal Employees Are Largely In Support Of Receiving A Vaccine Mandate

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U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell (from left), officers Michael Fanone and Daniel Hodges of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department, and Capitol Police Pfc. Harry Dunn are sworn in Tuesday before testifying before the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack. Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., pictured on July 1, has rejected two of the five members nominated by Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to serve on the Jan. 6 select committee to investigate the U.S. Capitol riot. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Biden has signed an executive order that calls for new policies around device repair and how much control manufacturers have over consumers' choices. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

President Biden Wants To Make It Easier For You To Get Your Broken Smartphone Fixed

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