Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Lee Harvey Oswald is shown on Nov. 22, 1963, after being arrested for the murder of President John F. Kennedy. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Most Of The New JFK Files Have Been Seen Before In Some Form

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The National Archives has released a batch of government files on the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. Jim Altgens/AP hide caption

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Jim Altgens/AP

2,800 JFK Assassination Files Have Been Released, Others Withheld

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This image provided by Emory University shows letters sent by then future President Barack Obama to his college girlfriend Alexandra McNear. The university is making the letters available to researchers Thursday. Ann Borden/Emory University/AP hide caption

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Ann Borden/Emory University/AP

In his opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rebuffed the panel's Democrats on the issue of executive privilege. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump participates in a series of radio interviews in the Indian Treaty Room of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Tuesday. Among the topics he discussed was his and past presidents' policies on reaching out to families of service members who have died. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

FEMA Looks To Hire 2,000 More People As It Responds To Long List Of Disasters

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In An Effort To Get People To Tune In, Government Agencies Try Podcasting

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President Trump holds a rally for Alabama Republican Senate candidate Luther Strange on Sept. 22 in Huntsville, Ala. After Strange lost the primary race, Trump's tweets promoting him were deleted. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., walks through Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol as he returns to work Thursday after being injured in a shooting at the Republican Congressional baseball team practice on June 14. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The travel ban, which has in the past led to chaos at airports and court cases, is one of the signature initiatives of the Trump administration. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images