Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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President Trump's executive order issued earlier this month would make it easier for the federal government to fire career civil servants. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

'A Huge Attack': Critics Decry Trump Order That Makes Firing Federal Workers Easier

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The Postal Service says it has already handled 100 million election ballots this year. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

100 Million Ballots, But Experts Say 'Heaven And Earth' Being Moved For Election Mail

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No Reason To Fear Mail-In Ballot Delays Just Yet

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Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 14. On Thursday, the committee voted to advance her nomination to the full Senate for a confirmation vote. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP

Supporters and opponents of the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett rally Wednesday at the Supreme Court. On Thursday, witnesses will speak at the Senate Judiciary Committee for and against President Trump's nominee to the court. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of her confirmation hearing Wednesday. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images) Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., talks during Tuesday's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Klobuchar questioned Barrett on why, in past writing, she didn't consider the abortion rights decision Roe v. Wade a "super-precedent." Patrick Semansky/Pool/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/Pool/AP

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett was asked her views on interpreting the meaning of the Constitution in her second day of confirmation hearings. Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., gives her opening remarks virtually during Amy Coney Barrett's Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Monday. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks during a confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on Capitol Hill on Monday. Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images

Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins (left) of Maine faces a tough challenge from Democratic Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Ranked-Choice Voting Could Play A Deciding Role In Maine's Senate Race

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