Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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A man walks outside the Apple store on Fifth Avenue in New York City on Wednesday. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

In a proposal the FCC is launching Thursday, you'd be able to own your own cable box instead of renting it from your provider. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

FCC Wants To Force Cable Companies, And Their Set-Top Boxes, To Adapt

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An instructor conducts a training session at Transportation Security Administration Academy at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, located at a sprawling former air base in Glynco, Ga. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Body Scanners And Explosives: TSA Starts Academy For Screeners

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New Hampshire Secretary Of State Defends Primary's First-In-The-Nation Status

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New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner talks with former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley as he files paperwork for the New Hampshire primary at Concord City Hall back in November. O'Malley has since ended his campaign. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

A New Hampshire primary event is "immediately recognizable," David M. Shribman writes in the Boston Globe. There are baseball-capped old people and banner-waving young people — and candidates putting in long hours of face time. Here, Bernie Sanders speaks to an overflow crowd through a megaphone after a campaign event at the New England College on May 27, 2015, in Concord, N.H. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, shown here at a rally last November in Concord, N.H. "Why people are so angry is, they're working harder and harder [and] many of them are slipping into poverty. Everyone is worried about the future of their kids," he said this week. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

This Election, Anger And Frustration Aren't Just On The Right

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Clinton, Sanders Step Up Attacks As Iowa Caucuses Near

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Homeland Security Begins Crackdown On 'Real IDs'

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International travelers wait to have their passports checked at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport last year. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Visa Rules May Burden Relatives Abroad, Advocates Say

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Carly Fiorina's Start In Business Began In Washington, D.C.

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