Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Historians and activists charge that the White House has failed to keep notes of the president's meetings with foreign leaders, including with Russian President Vladimir Putin Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Off The Record: Trump Administration Criticized For How It Keeps Documents

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Some Fear White House Is Destroying Or Failing To Keep Public Records

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Attorney General William Barr arrives to hear President Trump deliver the State of the Union address in the House chamber on Feb. 4. The House Judiciary Committee has called for Barr to testify on March 31 about potential interference by Trump. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Former national security adviser John Bolton had said he would comply with a Senate subpoena during the impeachment trial, but the Senate voted against calling witnesses. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks toward the Senate floor on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. His party stayed largely united in voting to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., arrives for the impeachment trial of President Trump at the Capitol on Friday. Alexander, a key vote in the trial, says he plans to vote no on hearing witnesses. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Alexander Explains Decision Not To Call Witnesses In Trump Impeachment Trial

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves the Senate chamber during a recess in the impeachment trial of President Trump on Friday. Senators voted against admitting witnesses and new evidence on Friday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Chief Justice John Roberts, who reads the questions at the impeachment trial, blocked one query from Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., which may have revealed the identity of the whistleblower whose complaint sparked the impeachment inquiry. Senate Television via Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Television via Getty Images

The first question in the Senate impeachment trial came from Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, in conjunction with fellow moderates Susan Collins and Mitt Romney, on Wednesday. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

White House counsel Pat Cipollone speaks during the impeachment trial against President Trump in the Senate on Tuesday. Senate Television via Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Television via Getty Images

White House counsel Pat Cipollone departs the Senate following defense arguments by the Republicans in the impeachment trial of President Trump. The trial resumed on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP