Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., walks to a Democratic Caucus meeting at the Capitol on Tuesday. She told lawmakers to "stay focused on our purpose for the people" with the end of the special counsel's Russia investigation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

After Mueller Report Memo, Democrats Turn To Health Care — For Now

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Attorney General William Barr, seen leaving his home on March 21, will determine how much of the Mueller report to release to Congress and the public. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Attorney General William Barr is being urged by both Democrats and Republicans to make special counsel Robert Mueller's final report public. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump plans to nominate Stephen Dickson to lead the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency is under scrutiny for its response to two crashes of Boeing 737 airplanes, which are pictured here outside Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

After years of light regulation, the tech industry is coming under scrutiny from Congress and regulators due to a series of privacy breaches. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Targeting Online Privacy, Congress Sets A New Tone With Big Tech

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Legislation May Be In The Works On Capitol Hill To Crack Down On Big Tech

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White House communications official Bill Shine (left), then-White House chief of staff John Kelly and senior adviser Jared Kushner wait in the Oval Office in December 2018. The New York Times reports that Kelly opposed Kushner's security clearance, but President Trump overruled him and others. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Attorney Cynthia Singletary tells the public evidentiary hearing that her client, Leslie McCrae Dowless, will not testify without immunity about the 9th Congressional District election investigation, at the North Carolina State Bar in Raleigh on Monday. Juli Leonard/Pool/News & Observer hide caption

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Juli Leonard/Pool/News & Observer